Children with diplegic and hemiplegic cerebral palsy: Who can be paid more attention by rehabilitation physicians?

October 30, 2013

Improving standing balance in children with cerebral palsy is crucial to improve cognitive and motor functions. Studies have shown differences in sitting balance between children with cerebral palsy and normal children. Are there differences in standing balance between children with diplegic and hemiplegic cerebral palsy? Valeska Gatica Rojas and colleagues from the Laboratory of Human Motor Control, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Talca, Chile detected standing posture balance in children with diplegic and hemiplegic cerebral palsy using an AMTI model OR6-7 force platform with the eyes open and closed. Researchers found that diplegic patients exhibited weaker postural balance control ability and less standing stability compared with hemiplegic cerebral palsy patients. More special attention to spastic diplegia patients with cerebral palsy will help improve their motor functions. These findings were published in the Neural Regeneration Research (Vol. 8, No. 26, 2013).
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Article: " Differences in standing balance between patients with diplegic and hemiplegic cerebral palsy," by Valeska Gatica Rojas1, Guillermo Méndez Rebolledo2, Eduardo Guzman Muñoz3, Natalia Ibarra Cortés4, Caterine Berrios Gaete4, Carlos Manterola Delgado5 (1 Laboratory of Human Motor Control, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Talca, Talca, Chile; 2 Laboratory of Human Motor Control, School of Kinesiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Talca, Talca, Chile; 3 School of Kinesiology, University Santo Tomas, Talca, Chile; 4 Student School of Kinesiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Talca, Talca, Chile; 5 Program in Medical Sciences, University of the Frontera, Temuco, Chile)

Rojas VG, Rebolledo GM, Muñoz EG, Cortés NI, Gaete CB, Delgado CM. Differences in standing balance between patients with diplegic and hemiplegic cerebral palsy. Neural Regen Res. 2013;8(26):2478-2483.

Contact:

Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research
http://www.nrronline.org/

Full text:
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Neural Regeneration Research

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