Estrogen and progesterone receptor isoforms expression in the stomach of Mongolian gerbils

October 31, 2008

We have previously shown that E2 and P4 have clear and distinct effects on inflammatory response and gastric epithelial changes during early H. pylori infection. Recently, Ohtani et al., have shown a protective role of E2 administration in H. pylori-infected InGas mice. Other studies have demonstrated that E2 and P4 have anti-ulcerative effects in murine gastric mucosa. ER and PR have been reported in human, mouse and rat stomach. However, there is no information to date of their expression and regulation in Mongolian gerbil stomach.

Ovariectomized adult female gerbils were subcutaneously treated with E2, and E2+P4. Uteri and stomachs were removed, the latter were cut along the greater curvature, and antrum and corpus were excised. Proteins were immunoblotted using antibodies that recognize ER-alpha, ER-beta, and PR-A and PR-B receptor isoforms. Tissues from rats treated in the same way were used as control.

Specific bands were detected for ER-alpha (68 kDa), and PR isoforms (85 and 120 kDa for PR-A and PR-B isoforms, respectively) in uteri, gastric antrum and corpus. We could not detect ER-beta isoform. PR isoforms were not regulated by E2 or P4 in uterus and gastric tissues of gerbils. ER-alpha isoform content was significantly down-regulated by E2 in the corpus, but not affected by hormones in uterus and gastric antrum. We have detected ER-alpha and both PR isoforms in gerbil gastric antrum and corpus. In the antrum, none of the receptors was regulated by E2 and P4, but in gastric corpus we observed a down-regulation by E2. Thus, our results show that ER-alpha regulation also depends on the type of cells present in the mucosa. The mechanisms involved in the lack of regulation of PR in gerbil stomach, as well as the differential regulation of ER-alpha by E2 deserve further research. The presence of ER-alpha and PR isoforms in gerbil stomach suggests that E2 and P4 actions in this organ are in part mediated by their nuclear receptors.

A research article to be published on October 7,2008 in the World Journal of Gastroenterology addresses this question. The research team led by Dr. Camacho-Arroyo from Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México used commercially available antibodies to detect estrogen and progesterone receptors isoforms in female gerbil stomach. They also evaluated the effects of E2 and E2+P4 in the regulation of these receptors. As it has been previously reported that stomach has steroidogenic activity, and that both estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) play differential roles in response to gastric injury and H. pylori infection, it was important to be able to detect these proteins in Mongolian gerbils stomach.

Specific bands for estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha (68 kDa), progesterone receptor (PR)-A (85 kDa) and PR-B (120 kDa) were detected, unfortunately they were unable to detect ER-beta isoform. The identity of the receptors was defined by using rat uteri samples along with the Mongolian gerbil uteri. This is important because Mongolian gerbils sex steroid receptors have not been sequenced at the gene or protein levels. The detection of these receptors with antibodies raised against other specie receptors suggests high conservation of the specific epitopes among species. The validation of commercially available antibodies for ER and PR in Mongolian gerbils adds applicability to the results of this study.

The regulation of ER and PR by E2 and P4 was first defined in target organs in the reproductive tract, and after several studies, there is enough evidence that this regulation is tissue specific and it is associated to the function of E2 and P4 in every particular tissue. ER and PR expression regulation in Mongolian gerbils has not been reported previously. The lack of regulation of ER and PR in gerbil uteri deserved further investigation. The differential regulation in gastric antrum and corpus suggests differential roles of these receptors in the different gastric mucosa. This study raises interesting questions to be addressed in future research.
-end-
Reference
Saqui-Salces M, Neri-Gómez T, Gamboa-Dominguez A, Ruiz-Palacios G, Camacho-Arroyo I. Estrogen and progesterone receptor isoforms expression in the stomach of Mongolian gerbils. World J Gastroenterol 2008; 14(37): 5701-5706
http://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/14/5701.asp

Correspondence to:
Dr. Ignacio Camacho-Arroyo, Facultad de Química, Departamento de Biología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán, México DF04510, México.
camachoarroyo@gmail.com
Telephone: +52-55-56223869 Fax: +52-55-56162010

About World Journal of Gastroenterology

World Journal of Gastroenterology (WJG), a leading international journal in gastroenterology and hepatology, has established a reputation for publishing first class research on esophageal cancer, gastric cancer, liver cancer, viral hepatitis, colorectal cancer, and H pylori infection and provides a forum for both clinicians and scientists. WJG has been indexed and abstracted in Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, Science Citation Index Expanded (also known as SciSearch) and Journal Citation Reports/Science Edition, Index Medicus, MEDLINE and PubMed, Chemical Abstracts, EMBASE/Excerpta Medica, Abstracts Journals, Nature Clinical Practice Gastroenterology and Hepatology, CAB Abstracts and Global Health. ISI JCR 2003-2000 IF: 3.318, 2.532, 1.445 and 0.993. WJG is a weekly journal published by WJG Press. The publication dates are the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th day of every month. WJG is supported by The National Natural Science Foundation of China, No. 30224801 and No. 30424812, and was founded with the name of China National Journal of New Gastroenterology on October 1, 1995, and renamed WJG on January 25, 1998.

About The WJG Press

The WJG Press mainly publishes World Journal of Gastroenterology.

World Journal of Gastroenterology

Related Antibodies Articles from Brightsurf:

Scientist develops new way to test for COVID-19 antibodies
New research details how a cell-free test rapidly detects COVID-19 neutralizing antibodies and could aid in vaccine testing and drug discovery efforts.

Mussels connect antibodies to treat cancer
POSTECH research team develops innovative local anticancer immunotherapy technology using mussel protein.

For an effective COVID vaccine, look beyond antibodies to T-cells
Most vaccine developers are aiming solely for a robust antibody response against the SARS-CoV-2 virus, despite evidence that antibodies are not the body's primary protective response to infection by coronaviruses, says Marc Hellerstein of UC Berkeley.

Children can have COVID-19 antibodies and virus in their system simultaneously
With many questions remaining around how children spread COVID-19, Children's National Hospital researchers set out to improve the understanding of how long it takes pediatric patients with the virus to clear it from their systems, and at what point they start to make antibodies that work against the coronavirus.

The behavior of therapeutic antibodies in immunotherapy
Since the late 1990s, immunotherapy has been the frontline treatment against lymphomas where synthetic antibodies are used to stop the proliferation of cancerous white blood cells.

Re-engineering antibodies for COVID-19
Catholic University of America researcher uses 'in silico' analysis to fast-track passive immunity

Seroprevalence of antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 in 10 US sites
This study estimates how common SARS-CoV-2 antibodies are in convenience samples from 10 geographic sites in the United States.

Neutralizing antibodies in the battle against COVID-19
An important line of defense against SARS-CoV-2 is the formation of neutralizing antibodies.

Three new studies identify neutralizing antibodies against SARS-CoV-2
A trio of papers describes several newly discovered human antibodies that target the SARS-CoV-2 virus, isolated from survivors of SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV infection.

More effective human antibodies possible with chicken cells
Antibodies for potential use as medicines can be made rapidly in chicken cells grown in laboratories.

Read More: Antibodies News and Antibodies Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.