Nav: Home

Understanding the fascinating interaction between bone and brain

October 31, 2016

"The best news is that the brain has become front and centre in the regulation of bone modelling", conclude authors Professors Paul Dimitri and Cliff Rosen in their concise review of the complex role of the central nervous system in bone metabolism.

The review "The Central Nevous System and Bone Metablism: An Evolving Story", published in Calcified Tissue International & Musculoskeletal Research, shows how our understanding of the control of skeletal metabolism has undergone a dynamic shift in the last two decades, primarily driven by greater understanding of energy metabolism. It also points to future directions and challenges faced by researchers as they try to better understand the complex interaction between the musculoskeletal and central nervous systems.

The authors review the latest research into the role of central regulators of bone metabolism, including leptin, neuropeptide Y (NPY), serotonin, endocannabinoids, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), adiponectin, melatonin and neuromedin U. They also discuss the role of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems in the control of skeletal metabolism, as evidence for the broader autonomic skeletal regulation. Sensory innervation of bone is also a focus, further extending our understanding of the complex neuronal regulation of bone mass.

Professor Dimitri, Professor of Child Health & Director of Research & Innovation at Sheffield Children's Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, UK stated:

"Whilst scientific advance in this field of bone metabolism has been rapid, progress is still required to understand how these model systems work in relation to the numerous and complex factors that influence skeletal metabolism, particularly in humans. Our rapidly evolving understanding of the physiological aspects of bone remodelling together with the development of more sophisticated technology will in time help us to reach this goal."
-end-
Dimitri, P. & Rosen, C. The Central Nevous System and Bone Metablism: An Evolving Story.

Calcif Tissue Int (2016). doi:10.1007/s00223-016-0179-6

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00223-016-0179-6

About Calcified Tissue International & Musculoskeletal Research

Calcified Tissue International & Musculoskeletal Research is a peer-reviewed journal which publishes original preclinical, translational and clinical research, and reviews concerning the structure and function of bone, and other musculoskeletal tissues in living organisms, as well as clinical studies of musculoskeletal disease. It includes studies of cell biology, molecular biology, intracellular signaling, and physiology, as well as research into the hormones, cytokines and other mediators that influence the musculoskeletal system. The journal also publishes clinical studies of relevance to bone disease, mineral metabolism, muscle function, and musculoskeletal interactions.

Editors in Chief: Stuart Ralston and René Rizzoli; Musculoskeletal Research Section Editor: Roger Fielding.

Become an IOF Professional member to freely access IOF scientific journals via the IOF website: https://www.iofbonehealth.org/civicrm/contribute/transact?destination=user/register&reset=1&id=1

About IOF

The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) is the world's largest nongovernmental organization dedicated to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis and related musculoskeletal diseases. IOF members, including committees of scientific researchers as well as 234 patient, medical and research societies in 99 locations, work together to make bone, joint and muscle health a worldwide heath care priority. http://www.iofbonehealth.org / http://www.facebook.com/iofbonehealth @iofbonehealth http://www.worldosteoporosisday.org

International Osteoporosis Foundation

Related Bone Articles:

What bone proteomics could reveal about the dead
Studying bones has helped scientists reconstruct what dinosaurs and other extinct creatures looked like.
Another reason to exercise: Burning bone fat -- a key to better bone health
It's a fat-burning secret anyone interested in bone health should know.
New material regrows bone
A team of researchers repaired a hole in a mouse's skull by regrowing 'quality bone,' a breakthrough that could drastically improve the care of people who suffer severe trauma to the skull or face.
How the heart turns into bone
Connective tissue cells in the heart turn into bone-producing cells in response to injury, UCLA scientists report Nov.
Injected mix of bone-augmenting agents causes new bone growth in mouse jaws
A Tokyo Medical and Dental University(TMDU)-centered research team combined a protein that stimulates bone formation with a peptide that promotes osteoblast differentiation, and delivered them into mouse jawbones by injection within a gelatin carrier.
Soluble corn fiber can help young women build bone, and older women preserve bone
Supplementing with soluble corn fiber at two critical times in a woman's life -- adolescence and post-menopause -- can help build and retain calcium in bone, according to new research from Purdue University.
A better bone replacement: 3-D printed bone with just the right mix of ingredients
To make a good framework for filling in missing bone, mix at least 30 percent pulverized natural bone with some special man-made plastic and create the needed shape with a 3-D printer.
Drug candidate halts crippling excess bone growth in animal model of a rare bone disease
New research in laboratory animals suggests that the drug palovarotene may prevent multiple skeletal problems caused by a rare but extremely disabling genetic bone disease, and may even be a candidate for use in newborn babies with the condition.
Reprogramming bone tumors
There exist several oncogenes that drive cancer. In many cases, however, the oncogenes themselves are not sufficient and must be complemented with other mutations before cancer develops.
Virtual bone biopsy helps identify why people with diabetes are at risk of bone fractures
A Southampton study using high-resolution imaging to create a 'virtual bone biopsy' has shed new light on why people with type 2 diabetes are at risk of bone fractures.

Related Bone Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Setbacks
Failure can feel lonely and final. But can we learn from failure, even reframe it, to feel more like a temporary setback? This hour, TED speakers on changing a crushing defeat into a stepping stone. Guests include entrepreneur Leticia Gasca, psychology professor Alison Ledgerwood, astronomer Phil Plait, former professional athlete Charly Haversat, and UPS training manager Jon Bowers.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#524 The Human Network
What does a network of humans look like and how does it work? How does information spread? How do decisions and opinions spread? What gets distorted as it moves through the network and why? This week we dig into the ins and outs of human networks with Matthew Jackson, Professor of Economics at Stanford University and author of the book "The Human Network: How Your Social Position Determines Your Power, Beliefs, and Behaviours".