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Esophageal capsule technology proves as effective as endoscopy

November 01, 2004

ORLANDO (November 1, 2004)--Researchers in a multi-center pivotal trial of M2A© Esophageal Capsule Endoscopy (Given Imaging, Yoqneam, Israel) found that this new technology is comparable to upper GI endoscopy for the detection of severe esophageal problems.

The researchers studied 82 patients, including 73 patients with gastroesophageal reflux and 9 patients undergoing surveillance for Barrett's esophagus, a pre-cancerous condition found in up to thirteen percent of GERD patients. Individuals with Barrett's are at an increased risk of developing esophageal adenocarcinoma.

Patients in the study ingested the esophageal capsules in a supine position and subsequently were placed under conscious sedation for an upper GI endosocpy. The investigators interpreting the videos from the esophageal capsules were blinded to the results of the traditional endscopy, and vice versa.

Of the 82 patients, 55 had positive findings on upper GI endoscopy. The esophageal capsule identified esophageal abnormalities in 51 of the 55 patients. The sensitivity of the esophageal capsule for detecting Barrett's was 97 percent and the specificity was 100%. Investigators reported no side effects or ingestion difficulties in any of the 82 patients.

The investigators conclude that the esophageal capsule is convenient, safe and sensitive for visualization of esophageal disorders.
-end-
About Capsule Endoscopy

In wireless capsule endoscopy, the patient swallows a tiny imaging capsule that incorporates a light source, video camera, battery, antenna and radio transmitter. The new esophageal capsule is identical in shape and dimensions to the standard M2Aâ capsule. It acquires video images from both ends of the devices at a rate of 2 frames per second per end.

The ACG was formed in 1932 to advance the scientific study and medical treatment of disorders of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The College promotes the highest standards in medical education and is guided by its commitment to meeting the needs of clinical gastroenterology practitioners. Consumers can get more information on GI diseases through the following ACG-sponsored programs:
  • 1-800-978-7666 (free brochures on common GI disorders, including ulcer, colon cancer, gallstones, and liver disease)
  • 1-866-IBS-RELIEF and www.ibsrelief.org (free educational materials)
  • 1-800-HRT-BURN (free brochure and video on heartburn and GERD)
  • www.acg.gi.org (ACG's Web site)

    American College of Gastroenterology

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