4 projects target cystic fibrosis with Hunt for a Cure funds

November 01, 2011

EAST LANSING, Mich. -- Discovering new treatments and battling dangerous infections are the focus of four Michigan State University researchers targeting the genetic disorder cystic fibrosis with projects funded by a Grand Rapids-based advocacy organization.

The research studies, with support from a $110,000 grant from Hunt for a Cure and administered by MSU's Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute, expand the relationship between the two organizations. Funding from Hunt for a Cure already has established a mouse colony at MSU that has been key in providing data on preventing cystic fibrosis infection in the lungs, said Gregory Fink of MSU's Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute.

"We have found Hunt for a Cure to be amazingly well-informed on the science of cystic fibrosis and highly sophisticated in its understanding of the medical research process, and we're proud that MSU scientists helped improve our management of this extremely important health problem," he said.

Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disease that causes the body to produce abnormally thick, sticky mucus, leading to life-threatening lung infections. Although a rarer disease, it is ranked as one of the most widespread life-shortening genetic diseases; 1 in 4,000 U.S. children are born with the disease.

The four new MSU projects are led by: Since 2008, the Grand Rapids-based Hunt for a Cure has donated more than $215,000 to MSU.

"The funding has allowed us to expand our research capabilities in this field and allows possible new therapies to be tested much more rapidly and safely than before," Fink said.
-end-
For more information on Hunt for a Cure, visit http://www.huntforacure.com/.

Michigan State University has been working to advance the common good in uncommon ways for more than 150 years. One of the top research universities in the world, MSU focuses its vast resources on creating solutions to some of the world's most pressing challenges, while providing life-changing opportunities to a diverse and inclusive academic community through more than 200 programs of study in 17 degree-granting colleges.

Michigan State University

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