Women undergoing PCI display greater number of co-morbidities than men

November 01, 2011

New research shows that women undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), also known as angioplasty, exhibit more co-morbidities and cardiovascular risk factors than men. Risk-adjusted analyses have now indicated that, in the contemporary era, gender is not an independent mortality predictor following PCI according to the study now available in Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions, a journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI).

Each year more than one million Americans undergo PCI to open blocked arteries according to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. Prior studies have given conflicting reports regarding the outcomes of females versus males after PCI, with some suggesting women have poorer outcomes compared to men and others finding little or no difference. This contradiction in results has remained under dispute, with some experts suggesting that improved PCI techniques, modification of risk-factors and pharmacological advances may balance adverse outcomes between the genders.

To clarify these gender differences, Annapoorna Kini, MD, and colleagues from Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, explored PCI outcomes in a racially diverse patient group at a high-volume, tertiary hospital. The team identified 4761 female and 8991 male patients at their institution who underwent PCI between April 2003 and 2009. Information including clinical characteristics, procedural details, laboratory and diagnostic test results, as well as 30-day and 1-year follow-up data, was collected.

"Our findings extend previous research, and definitively show that following PCI, women do not have an inherently greater mortality risk compared to men," explains Dr. Kini. "However, we did find that prognostic risk factors were significantly more prevalent in women." Results showed that compared to men, females were older, and were more likely to have hypertension, diabetes, and higher LDL cholesterol levels. Kini added, "While men did have higher rates of some modifiable risk-factors, such as smoking, women certainly had a far greater overall burden of co-morbidities and adverse prognostic factors." The data showed that a greater number of women also presented with an unstable coronary syndrome.

In the key findings of this study, the unadjusted post-PCI mortality rate was higher in women compared with men, with 30-day rates of 1.3% versus 0.8%; one-year at 6.1% versus 4.8%; and three-year at 10.4% versus 8.4%. Adjusted modeling, however, which accounted for the gender-imbalance in risk factors, proved that women were not at higher mortality risk than men following PCI in this racially diverse group. Dr. Kini concluded, "While our study found no risk-adjusted difference in mortality between men and women, both sexes would benefit from attention to modifying factors that reduce the risk of heart disease--eliminating smoking, engaging in physical activity, and eating a healthy diet."

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that heart disease is the leading cause of death among men and women, killing more than one in every four Americans.
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This study is published in Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions. Media wishing to receive a PDF of the article may contact healthnews@wiley.com.

Full citation:"Female Gender and Mortality After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Results From a Large Registry." Jason C. Kovacic, Roxana Mehran, Rucha Karajgikar, Usman Baber, Javed Suleman, Michael C. Kim, Prakash Krishnan, George Dangas, Samin K. Sharma and Annapoorna Kini. Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions; Published Online: November 1, 2011 (DOI: 10.1002/ccd.23338); Print Issue Date: November 2011. http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ccd.23338

Author Contact: Media wishing to speak with Dr. Kini may contact Jacqueline Nordstrom with Mount Sinai Hospital at jacqueline.nordstrom@mountsinai.org or 212-241-0592.

Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions is the official journal of The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions. This international journal covers the broad field of cardiovascular diseases. Subject material includes basic and clinical information that is derived from or related to invasive and interventional coronary or peripheral vascular techniques. The journal focuses on material that will be of immediate practical value to physicians providing patient care in the clinical laboratory setting. To accomplish this, the journal publishes Preliminary Reports and Work In Progress articles that complement the traditional Original Studies, Case Reports, and Comprehensive Reviews. Perspective and insight concerning controversial subjects and evolving technologies are provided regularly through Editorial Commentaries furnished by members of the Editorial Board and other experts. Articles are subject to double-blind peer review and complete editorial evaluation prior to any decision regarding acceptability. For more information, please visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1522-726X.

The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) is the primary professional association for invasive and interventional cardiologists, representing over 4,300 physicians in 60 countries. The Society's mission is to promote excellence in invasive and interventional cardiovascular medicine through physician education and representation, its monthly journal Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions, and the advancement of quality standards to enhance patient care. For more information, please visit http://www.scai.org or SCAI's comprehensive patient education website, http://www.SecondsCount.org.

Wiley-Blackwell is the international scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly publishing business of John Wiley & Sons, with strengths in every major academic and professional field and partnerships with many of the world's leading societies. Wiley-Blackwell publishes nearly 1,500 peer-reviewed journals and 1,500+ new books annually in print and online, as well as databases, major reference works and laboratory protocols. For more information, please visit http://www.wileyblackwell.com or our new online platform, Wiley Online Library (http://www.wileyonlinelibrary.com), one of the world's most extensive multidisciplinary collections of online resources, covering life, health, social and physical sciences, and humanities.

Wiley

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