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Experts explore how to use and share routinely collected clinical data on a global scale

November 01, 2016

Researchers are exploring ways to help clinicians and investigators use and share routinely collected medical data (such as information in electronic health records) to improve care and advance clinical research.

In a recent article, experts note that with the development of platforms enabling the use of routinely collected clinical data in the context of international research, scalable solutions for cross-border and cross-domain interoperability need to be developed.

"We provide insights on the requirements needed to achieve this and the need for a rigorous governance process to ensure the quality of data standardization," said Dr. Christel Daniel, lead author of the Learning Health Systems article.
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Wiley

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