Cornell will host the Northeast Biofuel Summit, Nov. 11-13

November 02, 2007

ITHACA, N.Y. - Cornell University will host the Northeast Biofuel Summit, Nov. 11-13, at the Statler Hotel on the Cornell campus. The summit will assess the region's current biomass inventory, including agricultural feedstock designated for fuel.

The conference also will develop strategies to diversify and expand biofuel feedstocks (those plants which can be distilled into fuel) for the Northeast, as participants will assess the Northeast's ability to meet its share of the 1.3 billion ton biomass goal, as defined by the joint USDA/Department of Energy study: "Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply," issued in 2005.

William Chernicoff, manager of the hydrogen, biofuels and climate change programs at the U.S. Department of Transportation, will provide the keynote address titled "Biofuels and Transportation: Perspectives on Sustainability and Pathways Forward" on Monday, Nov. 12, at 8 a.m. in the Statler Ballroom.

The Northeast Regional Sun Grant Biomass Energy Feedstock partnership includes: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia,

In addition to Cornell, participants in the summit include: U.S. Department of Transportation, Sun Grant universities, U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
-end-
WHAT: Northeast Biofuel Summit

WHEN: Nov. 11-13, 2007

WHERE: Statler Hotel, Cornell University campus

WHO: Hosted by Cornell University and its Sun Grant program

NOTE: Editors, you, your reporters and photographers are welcome to cover this conference. To obtain credentials, please call Blaine Friedlander of the Cornell Press Office at (607) 254-8093. The conference program is available from Friedlander at bpf2@cornell.edu.

Cornell University

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