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Partnership for Military Medicine Symposium

November 02, 2009

WHO

General James Amos, Assistant Commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps
Lieutenant General Eric Schoomaker, Surgeon General of the U.S. Army
Ms. Ellen Embrey, Acting Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs
Dr. David Morens, Senior Advisor to the Director, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
Dr. Robert Ursano, Director, Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences
Captain Kevin L. Russell, M.D., Director, Department of Defense Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System
Captain Tanis Batsel Stewart, Director, Emergency Preparedness and Contingency Support, Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery

WHAT

Partnership for Military Medicine Symposium features keynote addresses and panel presentations from leading military and civilian experts on collaborations in humanitarian aid and disaster response, posttraumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury, and global infectious diseases. Full agenda at www.hjf.org/symposium.

WHEN

Friday, November 6, 2009; 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

WHERE

Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, D.C.
-end-
WHY:

The Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine has partnered with The Tug McGraw Foundation to present the Partnership for Military Medicine Symposium to foster collaborations between the public and private sectors to advance medical care and quality of life for our wounded warriors and civilians.

MEDIA

Media coverage is invited for the symposium. Credentials are required and can be obtained via www.countryunited.org. Interviews with some participants may be arranged by request.

CONTACTS
Patty Keller
312-550-5394
patty.keller@ritzcommunications.com

Carrie Sessine
Ritz Communications
703-360-3658
carrie.sessine@ritzcommunications.com

Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine

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