New test will combat major cause of preventable blindness in Africa

November 02, 2014

Seattle, November 2, 2014--A new test will accelerate global progress toward eliminating onchocerciasis, a leading cause of preventable blindness in Africa. PATH, an international nonprofit health organization, today announced the availability of the SD BIOLINE Onchocerciasis IgG4 rapid test, manufactured and distributed by Standard Diagnostics, Inc. (SD). Designed for use in disease surveillance, the antibody-based test is faster, easier-to-use, and more acceptable to impacted communities than the current option. It is the first in a suite of diagnostic innovations by PATH intended to support the elimination of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), a group of illnesses that affect more than a billion people worldwide.

Millions at risk


Onchocerciasis, commonly known as river blindness, is caused by a parasitic worm transmitted to humans through the bite of the blackfly. It causes itching, skin disfiguration, and, with chronic exposure, permanent blindness. Globally, an estimated 120 million people are at risk for river blindness, and 18 million are infected. The disease typically affects poor, rural communities who live near streams and rivers. In the past, entire communities fled their homes to avoid contracting the disease, leaving valuable farmland behind and putting their livelihood at risk.

Elimination in reach


Effective and widespread treatment, control, and surveillance, together with the efforts of international and local leaders, have put the global elimination of river blindness within reach. In the past two years, the World Health Organization (WHO) has declared two countries in the Americas, Columbia and Ecuador, free of the disease. Achieving the same elimination goals in African countries requires better diagnostic tools.

The easy-to-use new rapid test meets this need by supporting fast, effective, and community-wide testing to identify areas where the disease is still active, guide the allocation of limited resources, prevent the disease from reemerging, and confirm elimination. By streamlining testing, it can help expand surveillance activities and accelerate global efforts to stop river blindness for good.

"The proven technology behind this test makes it a powerful and reliable tool in the multinational collaboration to eliminate river blindness," said David C. Kaslow, vice president for Product Development at PATH. "The availability of a rapid, point-of-care diagnostic is a harbinger of a world free of the suffering caused by this insidious parasite. What's needed now is quick action to add this simple test to control and elimination programs."

An appropriate tool


The new onchocerciasis test is specifically tailored for use in the remote, low-resource settings where it is needed most. It offers a breakthrough alternative to the existing test, which involves a painful procedure to remove a small portion of skin for examination under a microscope. When faced with this prospect, some communities avoid participating in surveillance testing altogether.

The Onchocerciasis IgG4 rapid test requires just a small drop of blood, taken with a simple fingerprick. By detecting unique antibodies to the parasite, it quickly identifies previous exposure. The test is affordable, provides results within 20 minutes, and is easy for health care workers to use and interpret in almost any setting.

"We are pleased to provide the manufacturing resources and industry experience to bring this powerful new test to the global market," says Byung-Ki Cho, CEO of SD. "As a frontrunner for better NTD diagnostics, the SD BIOLINE Onchocerciasis IgG4 rapid test is answering the global call for tools to speed elimination. We look forward to helping NTD programs in affected countries adopt the new test."

Stamping out NTDs


River blindness and other NTDs exact a devastating toll on vulnerable communities in sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and Central and South America. Through illness, disability, pain, and suffering, they damage health and economic development and perpetuate cycles of poverty and inequity. Recognizing this threat, the WHO has targeted 17 NTDs, including river blindness, for control, elimination, or eradication by 2020. Developing new diagnostics is one key priority.

The new rapid test is a bold first step. Over the next several years, PATH will leverage its expertise, innovation, and global partnerships to speed the development of a suite of diagnostic tools to help eliminate several other NTDs. Together, these collaborative efforts will reduce suffering, improve health equity, and help communities thrive worldwide.
-end-
About our partners

The SD BIOLINE Onchocerciasis IgG4 rapid test is the result of an innovative public-private partnership between PATH; the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the US National Institutes of Health; Standard Diagnostics, Inc.; and the broader onchocerciasis community. Funding was provided by a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. PATH is actively seeking collaborators for early introduction studies of the test. For more information about the river blindness rapid test or to discuss partnering with PATH, please contact us at dxinfo@path.org or visit http://sites.path.org/dx/ntd/oncho/.

About PATH


PATH is the leader in global health innovation. An international nonprofit organization, PATH saves lives and improves health, especially among women and children. Accelerating innovation across five platforms--vaccines, drugs, diagnostics, devices, and system and service innovations--PATH harnesses its entrepreneurial insight, scientific and public health expertise, and passion for health equity. By mobilizing partners around the world, PATH takes innovation to scale, working alongside countries primarily in Africa and Asia to tackle their greatest health needs. With these key partners, PATH delivers measurable results that disrupt the cycle of poor health. Learn more at http://www.path.org.

PATH

Related Disease Articles from Brightsurf:

CLCN6 identified as disease gene for a severe form of lysosomal neurodegenerative disease
A mutation in the CLCN6 gene is associated with a novel, particularly severe neurodegenerative disorder.

Cellular pathway of genetic heart disease similar to neurodegenerative disease
Research on a genetic heart disease has uncovered a new and unexpected mechanism for heart failure.

Mechanism linking gum disease to heart disease, other inflammatory conditions discovered
The link between periodontal (gum) disease and other inflammatory conditions such as heart disease and diabetes has long been established, but the mechanism behind that association has, until now, remained a mystery.

Potential link for Alzheimer's disease and common brain disease that mimics its symptoms
A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital uncovered a group of closely related genes that may capture molecular links between Alzheimer's disease and Limbic-predominant Age-related TDP-43 Encephalopathy, or LATE, a recently recognized common brain disorder that can mimic Alzheimer's symptoms.

Antioxidant agent may prevent chronic kidney disease and Parkinson's disease
Researchers from Osaka University developed a novel dietary silicon-based antioxidant agent with renoprotective and neuroprotective effects.

Tools used to study human disease reveal coral disease risk factors
In a study published in Scientific Reports, a team of international researchers led by University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa postdoctoral fellow Jamie Caldwell used a statistical technique typically employed in human epidemiology to determine the ecological risk factors affecting the prevalence of two coral diseases--growth anomalies, abnormalities like coral tumors, and white syndromes, infectious diseases similar to flesh eating bacteria.

Disease-aggravating mutation found in a mouse model of neonatal mitochondrial disease
The new mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variant drastically speeds up the disease progression in a mouse model of GRACILE syndrome.

Human longevity largest study of its kind shows early detection of disease & disease risks
Human Longevity, Inc. (HLI) announced the publication of a ground-breaking study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

30-year study identifies need of disease-modifying therapies for maple syrup urine disease
A new study analyzes 30 years of patient data and details the clinical course of 184 individuals with genetically diverse forms of Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD), which is among the most volatile and dangerous inherited metabolic disorders.

Long-dormant disease becomes most dominant foliar disease in New York onion crops
Until recently, Stemphylium leaf blight has been considered a minor foliar disease as it has not done much damage in New York since the early 1990s.

Read More: Disease News and Disease Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.