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HKU Engineering Professor Ron Hui named a Fellow by the UK Royal Academy of Engineering

November 02, 2016

Professor Ron Hui, Chair Professor of Power Electronics and Philip Wong Wilson Wong Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Hong Kong, has been named a Fellow by the Royal Academy of Engineering, U.K., one of the most prestigious national academies.

Professor Hui attended the New Fellow Induction ceremony in London on October 20 (Thursday, HKT). The ceremony was officiated by HRH The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh and Senior Fellow of the Academy.

The citation for Professor Hui stated: "Professor Hui is a visionary inventor and researcher. His groundbreaking research focuses on power electronics, with emphasis on energy saving and reduction of electronic waste. His achievements involve fundamental engineering science and applications, influencing both academic and industrial worlds."

Professor Hui was delighted to receive the honour, he said: "I am deeply honoured being named a Fellow of the Academy, in recognition of my research in environmentally friendly and sustainable technologies. More importantly, it serves as important recognition of research efforts which help protect the Earth and its sustainability in the long run, for the well-being of our next generations. I am in particular grateful in this regard."

Over the last 20 years, Professor Ron Hui has focused his research on environmentally friendly technologies. His ground-breaking research focuses on Power Electronics, with emphasis on energy saving and reduction of electronic waste. Besides publishing extensively in top-tier research journals in power electronics, he has over 55 patents adopted by industry. His achievements Planar Wireless Power Transfer and Sustainable Lighting Technology have been previously recognised by the Institute of Electical & Electronic Engineers (IEEE) USA, Institution of Engineering & Technology (IET) UK and the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences & Engineering.

Professor Hui's inventions have underpined the key features of the World's 1st Wireless Power Standard "Qi", launched by the international Wireless Power Consortium (WPC) in 2010. Noting the surge of mobile phone chargers and their e-waste problem in early 2000's, he has pioneered a series of "Planar Wireless Charging technologies" covering (i) free-positioning, (ii) localized charging and (iii) load identification. Such user-friendly technologies have been adopted into "Qi" by the WPC, now comprising over 200 companies worldwide.

Professor Hui raised the electronic waste issues arising from electronic lighting products in early 2000. He has championed the concept of "Sustainable Lighting" that incorporates not only energy saving (as adopted in Energy Star), but also long product lifetime and recyclability of product components. He invented sustainable ballasts/drivers that outperform conventional ones with improved energy efficiency, lifetime and recyclability. He designed the world's first passive LED driver that has designed lifetime (>10 years) exceeding that of the LED devices. (now in production for street lighting). In 2009, he published the Photo-electro-thermal Theory for LED Systems, unifying the interactions of light, heat and power. Such theory has been adopted into the Industrial Electronics Handbook.

Professor Hui's achievements in Planar Wireless Charging Technology have been independently recognised by both of IET (UK) and IEEE (USA) with their "most prestigious awards" in Power Research:

2010 The IET Crompton Medal for achievements in Power

2015 IEEE William E. Newell Power Electronics Award (IEEE Technical Field Award - the highest honour in Power Electronics by the IEEE Award Board)

Moreover, he received the IEEE Rodulf Chope Research & Development Award (for Sustainable Lighting Technology) in 2010, and was honoured a Fellow of the Austrialian Academy of Technological Science and Engineering in the same year.

Presently, Professor Hui and his team are engaged in several exciting research ideas. He is studying new omnidirectional wireless power transfer (for 3-dimensional wireless charging) and electric springs (for stabilizing power systems with increasing renewable energy generation).
-end-


The University of Hong Kong

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