Nav: Home

Researchers identify additional inoculation source for lambic beer production

November 02, 2018

Washington, DC - November 2, 2018 - Researchers in Belgium have identified an additional inoculation source - the wooden casks or foeders - for producing lambic beers. Traditional lambic beer production takes place through wort inoculation with environmental air and fermentation and maturation in wooden barrels. Up to now, these lambic barrels have only been examined with culture-dependent techniques, missing a part of the microorganisms present. The research is published in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology.

To be able to clarify the role of casks and foeders as additional microbial inoculation source, the researchers determined the influence of the barrel characteristics and the cleaning procedures on the microbial communities of the interior barrel surfaces. The researchers plated and sequenced the swab samples obtained from the interior surfaces of different wooden casks and foeders used for traditional lambic beer production in Belgium. The samples revealed that the microbial compositions of these surfaces differed statistically throughout the barrel cleaning procedures applied. This helped to understand the complex spontaneous lambic beer fermentation and maturation process.

The microbial compositions of the interior barrel surfaces also differed statistically based on the barrel type, possibly reflecting different characteristics of the lambic barrels in terms of age, wood thickness, and wood porosity. This research will contribute to the continued optimization of the lambic beer production process as well as the wooden barrel cleaning procedures.
-end-
The American Society for Microbiology is the largest single life science society, composed of more than 30,000 scientists and health professionals. ASM's mission is to promote and advance the microbial sciences.

ASM advances the microbial sciences through conferences, publications, certifications and educational opportunities. It enhances laboratory capacity around the globe through training and resources. It provides a network for scientists in academia, industry and clinical settings. Additionally, ASM promotes a deeper understanding of the microbial sciences to diverse audiences.

American Society for Microbiology

Related Fermentation Articles:

Lactic acid bacteria present in kimchi cabbage and garlic carry out the fermentation
Kimchi, a traditional Korean fermented vegetable food, is fermented by lactic acid bacteria derived from raw ingredients, such as kimchi cabbage, garlic, ginger, and red pepper.
The secret of classic Belgian beers? Medieval super yeasts!
An international team of scientists, led by Prof. Kevin Verstrepen (VIB-KU-Leuven) and Prof.
Algae and bacteria team up to increase hydrogen production
A University of Cordoba research group combined algae and bacteria in order to produce biohydrogen, fuel of the future
The flavor of chocolate is developed during the processing of the cocoa beans
Can you manipulate the taste of noble cocoas in different directions to create exciting new flavours for the world's chocolate fans?
Breath! Respiring microbes generate more energy
Now, researchers have shown that it is possible to evoke a shift in the metabolism from fermentation to respiration of E. coli and baker's yeast by optimizing fermentation conditions.
Goat milk kefir is proven to be good for your health
A University of Cordoba research team, for the first time, applied a protein identification technique to this product on a massive scale and found activity of healthy compounds
New consolidated bio-saccharification technique for lignocellulose conversion developed
A research group from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, has developed a novel strategy for cost-efficient lignocellulose conversion.
Microbes help make the coffee
When it comes to processing coffee beans, longer fermentation times can result in better taste, contrary to conventional wisdom.
Scientists use microorganism to fabricate functional bacterial cellulose in situ
A research team led by Prof. XIAN Mo and ZHANG Haibo from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences developed a new method to use microorganism to fabricate functional bacterial cellulose in situ.
Researchers advance biomass transformation process
Professor WANG Feng from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and his colleagues from Peking University recently reported an efficient and novel catalytic method for the conversion of aqueous biomass fermentation broth to a water-immiscible product.
More Fermentation News and Fermentation Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Climate Mindset
In the past few months, human beings have come together to fight a global threat. This hour, TED speakers explore how our response can be the catalyst to fight another global crisis: climate change. Guests include political strategist Tom Rivett-Carnac, diplomat Christiana Figueres, climate justice activist Xiye Bastida, and writer, illustrator, and artist Oliver Jeffers.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Speedy Beet
There are few musical moments more well-worn than the first four notes of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. But in this short, we find out that Beethoven might have made a last-ditch effort to keep his music from ever feeling familiar, to keep pushing his listeners to a kind of psychological limit. Big thanks to our Brooklyn Philharmonic musicians: Deborah Buck and Suzy Perelman on violin, Arash Amini on cello, and Ah Ling Neu on viola. And check out The First Four Notes, Matthew Guerrieri's book on Beethoven's Fifth. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.