Nav: Home

Tropical Storm Meari forecast to intensify

November 04, 2016

Tropical Storm Meari is currently located 331 miles north of Ulithi which is an atoll in the Caroline Islands of the western Pacific Ocean. The storm has tracked northeastward at 7 knots per hour over the past six hours.

Satellite imagery is showing an organized low-level circulation with the system wrapping tightly around itself. The tightly curved banding supports the current tracking forecast with high confidence. The current intensity of the winds in the storm is clocking at 45 to 55 knots. There is also a favorable environment within the storm for further development.

Meari is expected to continue tracking northeastward over the next 48 hours. The vertical wind shear is expected to remain low which will contribute to its steady intensification. The storm is currently forecast to peak in intensity at 85 knots (97 mph). No landmasses are currently being threatened by this storm. After reaching peak intensity Meari will start to weaken and veer northeast.

All tropical storms are tracked throughout the weekend on the NASA's Hurricane page on Facebook located here: https://www.facebook.com/NASAHurricane
-end-


NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Related Tropical Storms Articles:

NASA examines potential tropical or sub-tropical storm affecting Gulf states
NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over a developing low pressure area in the Gulf of Mexico and gathered two days of rainfall and storm height information.
Space weather model simulates solar storms from nowhere
A kind of solar storm has puzzled scientists for its lack of typical warning signs: They seem to come from nowhere, and scientists call them stealth CMEs.
NASA's Fermi catches gamma-ray flashes from tropical storms
A thousand times a day, thunderstorms around the globe launch fleeting bursts of gamma rays.
NASA sees storms affecting the western US
Extreme rain events have been affecting California and snow has blanketed the Pacific Northwest.
Study finds more extreme storms ahead for California
MIT scientists have found that extreme precipitation events in California should become more frequent as the Earth's climate warms over this century.
Scientists examine 'perfect storms' fueling vast tropical biodiversity
Biodiversity on earth is greatest in the tropics with the number and variety of species gradually diminishing toward the poles.
Scientists see 'new Arctic' is more prone to melting and storms
Scientists in a rare and sometimes dangerous study of the Arctic have found that the region's thinning sea ice is more prone to melting and storms, threatening its role as a moderator of the planet's climate.
GPM sees deadly tornadic storms moving through US Southeast
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite gathered rainfall data on the severe storms that impacted the southeastern US over two days.
Scientists find link between tropical storms and decline of river deltas
Research by the University of Southampton shows that a change in the patterns of tropical storms is threatening the future of the Mekong River delta in Vietnam, indicating a similar risk to other deltas around the world.
NASA sees Tropical Storm Nicole going 'extra-tropical'
Tropical Storm Nicole was becoming extra-tropical when the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite passed over it from space and captured a visible picture of the storm.

Related Tropical Storms Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Jumpstarting Creativity
Our greatest breakthroughs and triumphs have one thing in common: creativity. But how do you ignite it? And how do you rekindle it? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on jumpstarting creativity. Guests include economist Tim Harford, producer Helen Marriage, artificial intelligence researcher Steve Engels, and behavioral scientist Marily Oppezzo.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#524 The Human Network
What does a network of humans look like and how does it work? How does information spread? How do decisions and opinions spread? What gets distorted as it moves through the network and why? This week we dig into the ins and outs of human networks with Matthew Jackson, Professor of Economics at Stanford University and author of the book "The Human Network: How Your Social Position Determines Your Power, Beliefs, and Behaviours".