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Tropical Storm Meari forecast to intensify

November 04, 2016

Tropical Storm Meari is currently located 331 miles north of Ulithi which is an atoll in the Caroline Islands of the western Pacific Ocean. The storm has tracked northeastward at 7 knots per hour over the past six hours.

Satellite imagery is showing an organized low-level circulation with the system wrapping tightly around itself. The tightly curved banding supports the current tracking forecast with high confidence. The current intensity of the winds in the storm is clocking at 45 to 55 knots. There is also a favorable environment within the storm for further development.

Meari is expected to continue tracking northeastward over the next 48 hours. The vertical wind shear is expected to remain low which will contribute to its steady intensification. The storm is currently forecast to peak in intensity at 85 knots (97 mph). No landmasses are currently being threatened by this storm. After reaching peak intensity Meari will start to weaken and veer northeast.

All tropical storms are tracked throughout the weekend on the NASA's Hurricane page on Facebook located here: https://www.facebook.com/NASAHurricane
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NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

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