New psoriatic arthritis treatment guideline presented at the 2017 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting

November 04, 2017

SAN DIEGO - Authors of the new American College of Rheumatology (ACR) / National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) treatment guideline for psoriatic arthritis (PsA) will present their draft recommendations during a session at the 2017 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting this week in San Diego. The guideline includes pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic recommendations for treating adult patients with active psoriatic arthritis. Both the ACR and NPF anticipate the guideline will play an important role in improving outcomes for individuals living with PsA.

The guideline development team used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology to develop the recommendations. GRADE uses systematic reviews of the scientific literature available to evaluate and grade the quality of evidence in a particular domain. The evidence reviews are then used to create guideline recommendations for or against particular therapy options that range from strong to conditional, depending on the quality of evidence available.

Details of the draft recommendations will be presented on Tuesday, Nov. 7, from 1 - 2 p.m. PT. A question-and-answer session for registered members of the press will follow at 2:30 p.m. in Room 27 AB. Journalists in attendance will have the opportunity to interview: The guideline manuscript is currently under peer review and is anticipated to be published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, Arthritis Care & Research and the Journal of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis in early 2018.
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About the ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting

The ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting is the premier meeting in rheumatology. With more than 450 sessions and thousands of abstracts, if offers a superior combination of basic science, clinical science, tech-med courses, career enhancement education and interactive discussions on improving patient care. For more information about the meeting, visit https://www.rheumatology.org/Annual-Meeting, or join the conversation on Twitter by following the official #ACR17 hashtag.

About the American College of Rheumatology

The American College of Rheumatology is an international medical society representing over 9,400 rheumatologists and rheumatology health professionals with a mission to empower rheumatology professionals to excel in their specialty. In doing so, the ACR offers education, research, advocacy and practice management support to help its members continue their innovative work and provide quality patient care. Rheumatologists are experts in the diagnosis, management and treatment of more than 100 different types of arthritis and rheumatic diseases. For more information, visit http://www.rheumatology.org.

About the National Psoriasis Foundation

Over the last 50 years, the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) has become the world's leading nonprofit patient advocacy organization fighting for individuals with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. NPF leads this fight by driving efforts for a cure and improving the lives of the more than 8 million Americans affected by this chronic disease. To date, NPF has funded more than $17 million in research grants and fellowships, and to commemorate 50 years, NPF plans to raise an additional $2 million for early scientific career research programs in 2017 alone. Each year, NPF strives to support, educate and advocate on behalf of more individuals living with or caring for someone with the disease than ever before. As part of that effort, NPF established the Patient Navigation Center to offer personalized assistance to everyone with psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis. Join our community today and help drive discovery and create community for all living with psoriatic disease.

American College of Rheumatology

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