Scientists grow carbon nanotube forest much longer than any other

November 04, 2020

Today, a multitude of industries, including optics, electronics, water purification, and drug delivery, innovate at an unprecedented scale with nanometer-wide rolls of honeycomb-shaped graphite sheets called carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Features such as light weight, convenient structure, immense mechanical strength, superior thermal and electrical conductivities, and stability put CNTs a notch above other material alternatives. However, to supply their rising industrial demand, their production must be constantly scaled up, and therein lies the main challenge to using CNTs.

While scientists have been able to grow individual CNTs approximately 50 cm in length, when they attempt arrays, or forests, they hit a ceiling at around 2 cm. This is because the catalyst, which is key to CNT growth occurring, deactivates and/or runs out before CNTs in a forest can grow any longer, driving up monetary and raw-material costs of CNT production and threatening to cap its industrial use.

Now, a ceiling-breaking strategy has been devised by a team of scientists from Japan. In their Carbon, the team presents a novel approach to a conventional technique that yields CNT forests of record length: ~14 cm--7 times greater than the previous maximum.
The team created a catalyst based on their
2Ox) catalyst coated onto a silicon (Si) substrate. This Gd layer prevented the deterioration of the catalyst to a certain extent, allowing the forest to grow up to around 5 cm in length.

To further prevent catalyst deterioration, the team placed the catalyst in their original chamber called the

This kept the catalyst going strong for 26 hours, in which time a dense CNT forest could grow to 14 cm. Various analyses to characterize the grown CNTs showed that they were of high purity and competitive strength.

This achievement not only overcomes hurdles to the widespread industrial application of CNTs but it opens doors in nanoscience research. "This simple but novel method that drastically prolongs catalyst lifetime by supplying ppm-level vapor sources is insightful for catalyst engineering in other fields such as petrochemistry and nanomaterial crystal growth," Sugime says. "The knowledge herein could be pivotal to making nanomaterials a ubiquitous reality."
-end-
Reference

Journal: Carbon

Title: Ultra-long carbon nanotube forest via in situ supplements of iron and aluminum vapor sources

Authors: Hisashi Sugime (a,b), Toshihiro Sato (a), Rei Nakagawa (a), Tatsuhiro Hayashi (c), Yoku Inoue (c), and Suguru Noda (a,b)

Affiliations: (a) Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Japan; (b) Waseda Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Japan; (c) Department of Electronics and Materials Science, Shizuoka University, Japan

DOI: 10.1016/j.carbon.2020.10.066

About Waseda University

Located in central Tokyo, Waseda University was founded in 1882 based on three principles: independence of scholarship, practical application of scholarship, and fostering of good citizens. Approximately 50,000 students are enrolled in one of the 13 undergraduate and 20 graduate schools. Waseda has produced many changemakers in its history, including seven prime ministers and leaders in government, journalism, science, literature, the arts, and more. With approximately 8,000 international students enrolled in AY2018, Waseda is proud to be one of the most global campuses in Japan. Students may choose to obtain their degrees entirely in English and learn Japanese in parallel to their major studies. For more information, visit:
https://www.waseda.jp/top/en/

Waseda University

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