CAD plus MDCT useful in finding lung nodules

November 05, 2007

Computer-aided detection combined with MDCT improves radiologists' ability to detect solid lung nodules early enough for them to be treated without increasing interpretation time according to a recent study conducted by researchers at Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere in Paris, France.

"The comparison of a current examination with prior examinations is a time-consuming and tedious task," said Philippe A. Grenier, MD, lead author of the study. "This study wanted to evaluate the potential of a computerized automated system to improve human efficiency in this way, and determine whether CAD systems improve the detection of actionable lung nodules," he said.

The study consisted of 54 pairs of low-dose MDCT chest exams. The CAD system detected 52 nodules that were 4 mm or larger in 25 exams. One cancer was initially missed by one radiologist but was correctly identified with CAD input. On average, readers spent 4-5 minutes per case to read the paired exams on CAD and 6-8 seconds per CAD mark. The CAD system successfully matched 91.3% of nodules detected in both exams.

"This demonstrates the added value of CAD systems as a second reader, CAD was sensitive allowing us the potential to assess more accurately the growth of indeterminate nodules, without compromising the reading time," said Dr. Grenier.

"We were surprised by the fact that the time spent on the CAD workstation reviewing the current and previous exams corresponded to the time necessary to detect and match lung nodules on the clinical workstation," said Dr. Grenier. "We have implemented CAD as part of our routine for these examinations," he said.
-end-
The full results of this study appear in the October issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology, published by the American Roentgen Ray Society.

American College of Radiology

Related Cad Articles from Brightsurf:

Study suggests pregnancy and ovarian function are risk factors for coronary artery disease
Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of death in both men and women.

Associations between vaspin levels and coronary artery disease
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.0565, Lutfu Askin, Okan Tanriverdi, Hakan Tibilli and Serdar Turkmen from the Department of Cardiology, Adiyaman Education and Research Hospital, Adiyaman, Turkey consider associations between vaspin levels and coronary artery disease.

Waist size, not body mass index, may be more predictive of coronary artery disease
For years, women have been told that weight gain could lead to heart disease.

Researchers develop novel imaging approach with potential to identify patients with CAD
Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have developed a novel imaging approach that has the potential to identify patients with coronary disease without administration of drugs or contrast dye and within a short 15 minute exam protocol.

First prospective registry confirms FFR impact treatment plans for patients with CAD
A prospective, multicenter, multinational study examines how fractional flow reserve (FFR) can impact treatment plans and outcomes in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) or acute coronary syndrome (ACS).

Imaging beyond the angiogram in women with suspected MI and no obstructive CAD
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications volume 4, issue 1, pp.

Early depression diagnosis is deadly serious for patients with coronary artery disease
While clinicians caring for patients with coronary artery disease may not always prioritize depression screening, an early diagnosis could be a matter of life and death.

Precision medicine test may help detect coronary artery disease
In a Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study, a blood-based precision medicine test incorporating age, sex, and gene expression score was helpful in evaluating older outpatients with symptoms suggestive of obstructive coronary artery disease.

Detecting mental health conditions in women veterans assists in identifying risk for CAD
Women Veterans exhibit a high degree of mental health issues that are associated with an increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD).

Genetic predisposition to higher calcium levels linked with increased risk of coronary artery disease
A genetic predisposition to higher blood calcium levels was associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease and heart attack, according to a study published by JAMA.

Read More: Cad News and Cad Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.