Biological warfare: What do you need to know?

November 05, 2007

HOUSTON, Nov. 5, 2007 - Highly infectious biological agents have been used to spread death and despair for centuries. A speaker coming to the University of Houston will address what we might confront if these agents were used today.

Manuel Guerrero, a medical analyst with the Civil Support Readiness Directorate of the U.S. Army North, will speak on "Awareness of Biological Agents" at noon, Friday, Nov. 9 in Room 130 of Science & Research Building Two. Part of the university's "Today's Health" lecture series, the event is free and open to the public.

His job involves training and evaluating nuclear science officers in operations and the detection of biological and toxic industrial chemicals with analytical equipment to assist in rapid response of terrorist incidents. He also instructs physicians, nurses and other medical personnel to recognize signs and symptoms of biological and chemical warfare agents and teaches them triage and medical management.

The talk at UH will address the management of biological casualties, with the intent to bring an awareness of common and uncommon biological agents. He will cover what biological agents are, their history, signs and symptoms, and how they're transmitted and affect us. Included in the discussion will be a breakdown of bacterial biological agents such as anthrax, viruses such as smallpox and toxins such as botulinum.

Guerrero received his undergraduate degree in biology from Iowa University and his graduate degree in human resources/psychology from Webster University. Prior to his current position, he served in the U.S. Army Medical Corps, where he retired with an honorable discharge after 24 years. During this time, he acquired vast experience setting up M.A.S.H. units and instructing medical emergency first responders.

Started in the fall of 2004, the "Today's Health" lecture series, sponsored by the UH Libraries and the UH College of Pharmacy, spotlights prominent professionals who address topics of importance to UH pharmacy students in a way that is accessible to general audiences. Past topics have included the relationship between traditional and modern medicine, the difficulty of staying current on the risks and benefits of new drugs, the use of stem cells in regenerative medicine, the practice of using tailor-made medications based on an individual's genetic information and the ins and outs of lawsuits in the pharmaceutical industry.

For more information about the "Today's Health" series, contact Nelda Cervantes, the College of Pharmacy's library supervisor, at lib10@mail.uh.edu or 713-743-1242.

WHO:
Manuel Guerrero, Medical Analyst, U.S. Army North
UH Libraries
UH College of Pharmacy

WHAT:
"Awareness of Biological Agents" lecture
"Today's Health" series

WHEN:
Noon to 1 p.m., Friday, Nov. 9

WHERE:
University of Houston
Science & Research Building Two, Room 130
Entrance 14 off Cullen Boulevard
-end-
For more information about UH, visit the university's Newsroom at http://www.uh.edu/news-events/.

To receive UH science news via e-mail, visit http://www.uh.edu/news-events/archive/sciencelist.html.

University of Houston

Related Health Articles from Brightsurf:

The mental health impact of pandemics for front line health care staff
New research shows the impact that pandemics have on the mental health of front-line health care staff.

Modifiable health risks linked to more than $730 billion in US health care costs
Modifiable health risks, such as obesity, high blood pressure, and smoking, were linked to over $730 billion in health care spending in the US in 2016, according to a study published in The Lancet Public Health.

New measure of social determinants of health may improve cardiovascular health assessment
The authors of this study developed a single risk score derived from multiple social determinants of health that predicts county-level cardiovascular disease mortality.

BU study: High deductible health plans are widening racial health gaps
The growing Black Lives Matter movement has brought more attention to the myriad structures that reinforce racial inequities, in everything from policing to hiring to maternal mortality.

Electronic health information exchange improves public health disease reporting
Disease tracking is an important area of focus for health departments in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.

E-health resource improves men's health behaviours with or without fitness facilities
Men who regularly used a free web resource made significantly more health changes than men who did not, finds a new study from the University of British Columbia and Intensions Consulting.

Mental health outcomes among health care workers during COVID-19 pandemic in Italy
Symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety and insomnia among health care workers in Italy during the COVID-19 pandemic are reported in this observational study.

Mental health of health care workers in china in hospitals with patients with COVID-19
This survey study of almost 1,300 health care workers in China at 34 hospitals equipped with fever clinics or wards for patients with COVID-19 reports on their mental health outcomes, including symptoms of depression, anxiety, insomnia and distress.

Health records pin broad set of health risks on genetic premutation
Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Marshfield Clinic have found that there may be a much broader health risk to carriers of the FMR1 premutation, with potentially dozens of clinical conditions that can be ascribed directly to carrying it.

Attitudes about health affect how older adults engage with negative health news
To get older adults to pay attention to important health information, preface it with the good news about their health.

Read More: Health News and Health Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.