ICDs can reduce sudden death in young patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

November 05, 2012

MINNEAPOLIS, MN - November 5, 2012 - A multicenter registry has demonstrated that the use of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) to combat sudden cardiac death in high-risk pediatric patients suffering from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The study is being presented Nov. 5 at the 2012 Scientific Sessions of the American Heart Association (AHA) in Los Angeles.

While the study found that the rate of possible device complications adds a level of complexity to this age group, it also demonstrated that life-saving ICD interventions were common in younger patients when terminating irregular heart rhythms, called ventricular tachyarrhythmias or fibrillation.

"While HCM is the most common cause of sudden death in the young,existing research has shown that the use of ICDs in adult patients with HCM have been very effective," said the study's lead author Barry J. Maron, MD, director of the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Center at the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation in Minneapolis. "This registry is continuing to reveal important implications for younger patients suffering from this disease ."

For the study, the researchers evaluated an international registry of ICDs, implanted from 1987 to 2011, and found 224 patients with HCM judged at high risk for sudden death who received ICDs. They found that 188 patients received ICDs for primary prevention and 36 for secondary prevention after undergoing evaluation at 22 referral and non-referral institutions in U.S., Europe and Australia.

ICDs terminated ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation in 19 percent of patients over 4.3 years, according to the study authors. Also, primary prevention discharge rate terminating ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation was the same in patients implanted for one, two, three or more risk factors.

Extreme LV hypertrophywas most frequently associated with appropriate interventions in patients experiencing primary prevention interventions (65 percent). Also, ICD-related complications, particularly inappropriate shocks and lead malfunction, occurred in 41 percent of the patients at 17 years.

ICDs are a potential life-saving device in children with HCM, the most common cause of sudden death in the young.
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About the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation

The Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation is dedicated to creating a world without heart disease through groundbreaking clinical research and innovative education programs. MHIF's mission is to promote and improve cardiovascular health, quality of life and longevity for all.

Scientific Innovation and Research - Publishing more than 120 peer-reviewed studies each year, MHIF is a recognized research leader in the broadest range of cardiovascular medicine. Each year, cardiologists and hospitals around the world adopt MHIF protocols to save lives and improve patient care.

Education and Outreach - Research shows that modifying specific health behaviors can significantly reduce the risk of developing heart disease. Through community programs, screenings and presentations, MHIF educates people of all walks of life about heart health. The goal of the Foundation's community outreach is to increase personal awareness of risk factors and provide the tools necessary to help people pursue heart- healthy lifestyles.

About the Minneapolis Heart Institute®

The Minneapolis Heart Institute® is recognized internationally as one of the world's leading providers of heart and vascular care. This state-of-the-art facility combines the finest in personalized patient care with sophisticated technology in a unique, family-oriented environment. The Institute's programs, a number of which are conducted in conjunction with Abbott Northwestern Hospital, address the full range of heart and vascular health needs: prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation.

Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation

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