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Cardiac arrest survival higher in states with required high school CPR training

November 05, 2018

DALLAS, Nov. 5, 2018 -- Required CPR education in high school may lead to higher bystander CPR and cardiac arrest survival rates, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Resuscitation Science Symposium 2018 - an international conference highlighting the best in cardiovascular resuscitation research.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 109,668 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests patients (64 percent men, 49.4 percent white, 19.1 percent African-American, 2.3 percent Hispanic, 2.9 percent other and 26.4 percent unknown) from the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival database or (CARES) - a surveillance registry tracking out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in communities in 42 states.

The database analysis included all nontraumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrests from 14 states and the District of Columbia where at least 50 percent of the population was in an area covered by a CARES participating agency from 2013 to 2017.

Researchers found that bystander CPR, survival to hospital discharge and neurologically favorable survival (mild to moderate cerebral incapacity) was higher in states that require CPR training in high school.

Of the cases studied from 2013 through 2017 (with people representing all ages), 59 percent occurred in states with required high school CPR training enacted. In those states:
  • 41.3 percent of people who suffered cardiac arrest outside of a hospital received bystander CPR before emergency medical services arrived, compared to 36.1 percent in states without CPR education laws enacted.

  • 11.3 percent of people who suffered cardiac arrest outside of a hospital survived to hospital discharge, compared to 8.9 percent for states without the laws enacted.

  • Neurologically favorable survival was more likely in states with the laws enacted, 9.5 percent compared to 7.6 percent for states without laws enacted.

Because CARES is a registry and data are owned by varying local and state agencies, information on specific states included in the study is confidential.
-end-
Note: Scientific presentation is 2:45 p.m. CT, Sunday, Nov. 11, 2018 at the Hyatt Regency Chicago

Victoria Vetter, M.D., MPH, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA

Additional Resources: Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at https://www.heart.org/en/about-us/aha-financial-information.

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is a leading force for a world of longer, healthier lives. With nearly a century of lifesaving work, the Dallas-based association is dedicated to ensuring equitable health for all. We are a trustworthy source empowering people to improve their heart health, brain health and well-being. We collaborate with numerous organizations and millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, advocate for stronger public health policies, and share lifesaving resources and information. Connect with us on heart.org, Facebook, Twitter or by calling 1-800-AHA-USA1.

American Heart Association

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