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STD crowd-diagnosis requests on social media

November 05, 2019

What The Study Did: Online postings seeking information on sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) on the social media website Reddit were analyzed to see how often requests were made for a crowd-diagnosis and whether the requested diagnosis was for a second opinion after seeing a health care professional.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

Authors: John W. Ayers, Ph.D., M.A., of the University of California, San Diego, is the corresponding author.

(doi:10.1001/jama.2019.14390)

Editor's Note: The article includes conflict of interest disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
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Media advisory: The full study is linked to this news release.

Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article This link will be live at the embargo time https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/10.1001/jama.2019.14390?guestAccessKey=04d5272e-2067-4f91-b210-8fca1223cd20&utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=110519

JAMA

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