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November 06, 2000

CPU Technology, a Navy Dual Use contractor, recently received Navy funding to develop system-on-a-chip (SOC) technology that will modernize obsolete computers on Navy ships and aircraft while preserving existing software. The SOC technology will be fully compatible with existing hardware but incorporate modern technology to increase system throughput and reliability. Software developed for existing military computer systems often takes years to develop and perfect and is very difficult to re-engineer. Unfortunately, the hardware it runs on may become obsolete in 18 months. CPU Technology's Validated Modernization™ provides the ideal solution to this problem. The latest commercial electronic technology is compatibly inserted into the current system to increase reliability and performance, while preserving existing software. The SOC technology is the Navy winner of the DoD Dual Use S&T Achievement Award. The award will be presented at the upcoming Technology Transition Conference 2000 in Tysons Corner, Va., at 9:45 a.m.,Wednesday, Nov. 8. Visit www.ncat.com to learn more about the conference.
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Office of Naval Research

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