Nav: Home

High blood pressure poses heart/stroke event risk for people under age 40

November 06, 2018

DURHAM, N.C. - People younger than age 40 who have high blood pressure are at increased risk of heart failure, strokes and blood vessel blockages as they age, according to a study in JAMA led by Duke Health.

The study, which used new guidelines issued in 2017 that lowered the clinical definition of high blood pressure from earlier levels, suggests that identifying and treating the condition in younger people might have long-term benefit.

"This is a first step in assessing whether high blood pressure, as defined by the new criteria, is something that younger people should be concerned about as a potential precursor to serious problems," said lead author Yuichiro Yano, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Community & Family Medicine at Duke.

"Although this is an observational study, it demonstrates that the new blood pressure guidelines are helpful in identifying those who might be at risk for cardiovascular events," Yano said.

Yano and colleagues analyzed more than 4,800 adults who had blood pressure measurements taken before age 40 as part of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study (CARDIA), which began in 1985. About half of participants were African-American, and 55 percent were women.

Study participants were sorted into four groups based on blood pressure levels set in 2017 by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association: Normal (120 or lower systolic blood pressure over 80 diastolic or less); elevated (120-129 over less than 80); stage 1 hypertension (130-139 over 80-89); or stage 2 hypertension (140 or greater over 90 or greater).

The researchers then tracked whether these participants had serious cardiovascular events over a median follow-up period of about 19 years. In all, 228 incidents occurred, with successively higher rates of events coinciding with successively higher blood pressure levels.

"Among young adults, those with elevated blood pressure, stage 1 hypertension, and stage 2 hypertension before age 40, as defined by the 2017 guidelines, had significantly higher risk for subsequent cardiovascular disease events, compared to those with normal blood pressure before age 40," Yano said.
-end-
In addition to Yano, study authors include Jared P. Reis, Laura A. Colangelo, Daichi Shimbo, Anthony J. Viera, Norrina B. Allen, Samuel S. Gidding, Adam Bress, Philip Greenland, Paul Muntner and Donald M. Lloyd-Jones.

The study received support from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (HHSN268201300025C, HHSN268201300026C, HSN268201300027C, HHSN268201300028C, HHSN268201300029C, HHSN268200900041C) and from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (P20GM104357).

Duke University Medical Center

Related Heart Failure Articles:

New hope for treating heart failure
Heart failure patients who are getting by on existing drug therapies can look forward to a far more effective medicine in the next five years or so, thanks to University of Alberta researchers.
Activated T-cells drive post-heart attack heart failure
Chronic inflammation after a heart attack can promote heart failure and death.
ICU care for COPD, heart failure and heart attack may not be better
Does a stay in the intensive care unit give patients a better chance of surviving a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or heart failure flare-up or even a heart attack, compared with care in another type of hospital unit?
Tissue engineering advance reduces heart failure in model of heart attack
Researchers have grown heart tissue by seeding a mix of human cells onto a 1-micron-resolution scaffold made with a 3-D printer.
Smoking may lead to heart failure by thickening the heart wall
Smokers without obvious signs of heart disease were more likely than nonsmokers and former smokers to have thickened heart walls and reduced heart pumping ability.
More Heart Failure News and Heart Failure Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans
More than test scores or good grades — what do kids need to prepare them for the future? This hour, guest host Manoush Zomorodi and TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, in and out of the classroom. Guests include educators Olympia Della Flora and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#535 Superior
Apologies for the delay getting this week's episode out! A technical glitch slowed us down, but all is once again well. This week, we look at the often troubling intertwining of science and race: its long history, its ability to persist even during periods of disrepute, and the current forms it takes as it resurfaces, leveraging the internet and nationalism to buoy itself. We speak with Angela Saini, independent journalist and author of the new book "Superior: The Return of Race Science", about where race science went and how it's coming back.