19th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Gravitational and Space Biology

November 07, 2003

What:
Hundreds of researchers will gather at the 19th annual meeting of the American Society for Gravitational and Space Biology to discuss how gravity affects every aspect of life. Founded in 1984, the organization fosters research, education and training in gravitational and space biology. Research developed by many of these scientists, engineers and educators is conducted aboard NASA spacecraft where a long-term low-gravity environment is sustained.

Who:
Featured speakers represent government, academia and industry. Presenters include NASA-funded researchers whose experiments have been performed on the International Space Station and the Space Shuttle as well as researchers who conduct ground-based, space-related research. The scientific program organizer for this meeting is Dr. Marian Lewis -- a researcher from the University of Alabama in Huntsville. Participants include two former astronauts: Dr. Owen Garriott, who performed research on Skylab and the Space Shuttle and is also a researcher at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, and Dr. Millie Hughes-Fulford, who performed research on the Space Shuttle and is a cell biology researcher at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in San Francisco. A session focusing on astrobiology -- the study of life in the universe, its origin, evolution, distribution and future - will be led by Dr. Rosalind Grymes, deputy director of NASA's Astrobiology Institute at Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif.

Who:
Two adjunct workshops also will be featured this year: a pre-meeting workshop on Nov. 12 will be moderated by Nancy Searby, a researcher at the Ames Research Center, will address the culture of cells in space. On Nov. 16, Dr. Joseph Ng, a researcher at the University of Alabama in Huntsville will lead a workshop on extremophiles -- organisms that can survive in some of the harshest conditions on Earth. For a complete agenda, visit: http://www.asgsb.org/annual_meeting.html

When:
Nov. 13, 8:30 a.m. to Nov. 16, 5 p.m. CST

Where:
Huntsville Marriott, 5 Tranquility Base, Huntsville

To attend:
News media interested in covering the event should contact the Marshall Media Relations Department at 256-544-0034 no later than Nov. 13.
-end-


NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center News Center

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