Consuming more vegetable protein may help kidney disease patients live longer

November 07, 2013

Atlanta, GA (November 7, 2013)--Increased consumption of vegetable protein was linked with prolonged survival among kidney disease patients in a new a study. The findings will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2013 November 5-10 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, GA.

Due to poor kidney function, toxins that are normally excreted in the urine can build up in the blood of individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Research shows that compared with animal protein, vegetable protein intake in patients is linked with lower production of such toxins. It is unclear whether consuming more vegetable protein prolongs CKD patients' lives, however.

To investigate, a team led by Xiaorui Chen (University of Utah) studied 1,104 CKD patients in the1988-1994 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III and asked them about their animal and vegetable protein intake.

After controlling for various factors such as age, smoking, and BMI, the researchers found that for each 10 gram increase in vegetable protein intake per day, participants had a 14% lower risk of dying by the end of 2006. "Interventional trials are needed to establish whether increasing vegetable protein will decrease mortality in the CKD population," they wrote.
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Study: "Higher Intake of Vegetable Protein Is Associated with Lower All-Cause Mortality in Chronic Kidney Disease" (Abstract 4058)

Disclosures: Tom Greene is a consultant for and receives research funding from Keryx Biopharmaceuticals, Genkyotech, Pharmalink, and Janssen Pharmaceuticals. Srinivasan Beddhu receives research funding from Takeda. The authors report receiving funding support from NIDDK.

ASN Kidney Week 2013, the largest nephrology meeting of its kind, will provide a forum for 14,000 professionals to discuss the latest findings in renal research and engage in educational sessions related to advances in the care of patients with kidney and related disorders. Kidney Week 2013 will take place November 5-10, 2013 in Atlanta, GA.

The content of this article does not reflect the views or opinions of The American Society of Nephrology (ASN). Responsibility for the information and views expressed therein lies entirely with the author(s). ASN does not offer medical advice. All content in ASN publications is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions, or adverse effects. This content should not be used during a medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Please consult your doctor or other qualified health care provider if you have any questions about a medical condition, or before taking any drug, changing your diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment. Do not ignore or delay obtaining professional medical advice because of information accessed through ASN. Call 911 or your doctor for all medical emergencies.

Founded in 1966, and with more than 14,000 members, the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) leads the fight against kidney disease by educating health professionals, sharing new knowledge, advancing research, and advocating the highest quality care for patients.

American Society of Nephrology

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