Tel Aviv University professor awarded inaugural prize for innovation in cancer treatment

November 07, 2014

Prof. Dan Peer of Tel Aviv University's Department of Cell Research and Immunology will be awarded $10,000 for his groundbreaking development in cancer treatment at the inaugural Untold News Awards on Wednesday, November 12, 2014, from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. at the Harmonie Club in New York City. Prof. Peer is one of three Israeli inventors to be selected for the award out of a pool of candidates submitted by prestigious Israeli institutions including TAU, Weizmann Institute of Science, Technion Israel Institute of Technology, and Hebrew University, amongst others.

An American non-profit, Untold News is dedicated to promoting Israeli inventors and educating Americans on the positive news generated from the State of Israel.

Prof. Peer, who is also Head of Nanomedicine and the Scientific Director of the Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology at TAU, will be honored for his development of the "cancer bullet." The treatment is an injectable form of patient-friendly chemotherapy that targets only diseased cells. According to Peer, this is the first time nanoparticles are used in clusters instead of individually and has shown little to now side effects in trials.

Winners were selected by a jury of American leaders including Mr. David Schizer, former Dean of Columbia Law School; Dr. Barry Coller, Chief Medical Officer, Rockefeller University; Tony Tether, former Director of DARPA; and Heidi Jacobus, Chariman and CEO of Cybernet Systems. This year's winners also include Israeli professor Shlomo Magdassi and engineer Idan Tobis.

Following their New York appearance, the winners will visit Philadelphia, Boston, and Washington DC.

A global hub of inventions

Untold News was founded by lifelong New Yorker and former advertising executive Marcella Rosen, who discovered that Israel is home to almost as many start-ups, inventions, and patents as the entirety of the European Union and has attracted twice as much venture capital per capita as the United States. "My mission," says Rosen, "is to help the world understand that Israel is more than a country at war. Our first ever Untold News Awards reception will showcase three amazing inventors and their inventions, whom the jury and I feel will unequivocally make a mark on the worldwide stage."
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American Friends of Tel Aviv University supports Israel's most influential, most comprehensive, and most sought-after center of higher learning, Tel Aviv University (TAU). A leader in the pan-disciplinary approach to education, TAU is internationally recognized for the scope and groundbreaking nature of its research and scholarship -- attracting world-class faculty and consistently producing cutting-edge work with profound implications for the future.

TAU is Israel's only institution of higher learning ranked among the world's top 200 universities by the authoritative Times Higher Education World University Rankings. It is one of a handful of elite international universities rated as the best producers of successful startups, and TAU alumni rank 9th in the world for the amount of American venture capital they attract.

American Friends of Tel Aviv University

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