Advanced kidney disease may increase the likelihood of falling into poverty

November 07, 2015

Highlights San Diego, CA (November 7, 2015) -- Advanced stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) may cause considerable financial strains for patients and their families, according to a study that will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3¬-8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.

The impact of CKD on a patient's household income is unclear. To determine whether CKD severity and side effects associated with the disease and its treatment were associated with a fall into poverty, Rachael Morton, PhD (The University of Sydney, in Australia) and her colleagues examined information on individuals with moderate-to-severe CKD who were participating in the Study of Heart and Renal Protection (SHARP) and were followed for a median of 5 years.

Of the 2914 participants who were included in the analysis, 933 were in poverty at screening and a further 436 (22% of the remaining) moved into poverty by the end of the study. The researchers found that CKD severity, but not side effects, was a significant predictor of a fall into poverty. Participants who received kidney transplants were 52% less likely to fall into poverty. Black ethnicity, low educational attainment, single adult household, and low income at the start of the study were also linked with a fall into poverty.

"Patients in advanced stages of CKD are at an increased risk of falling into financial hardship," the authors concluded. "Kidney transplantation may have a role in reducing the risks of household poverty due to CKD."
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Study: "The Impact of Chronic Kidney Disease on Household Income: Does Health Affect Wealth?" (Abstract SA-PO729)

Disclosures: Rachael L. Morton receives research funding from Baxter Healthcare Ltd. lan Cass receives research funding from Merck, Roche, Amgen, Baxter. Borislava N. Mihaylova receives research funding from Merck & Co. Inc. The authors acknowledge receiving government funding for their research.

ASN Kidney Week 2015, the largest nephrology meeting of its kind, will provide a forum for more than 13,000 professionals to discuss the latest findings in kidney health research and engage in educational sessions related to advances in the care of patients with kidney and related disorders. Kidney Week 2015 will take place November 3-8, 2015 in San Diego, CA.

The content of this article does not reflect the views or opinions of The American Society of Nephrology (ASN). Responsibility for the information and views expressed therein lies entirely with the author(s). ASN does not offer medical advice. All content in ASN publications is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions, or adverse effects. This content should not be used during a medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Please consult your doctor or other qualified health care provider if you have any questions about a medical condition, or before taking any drug, changing your diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment. Do not ignore or delay obtaining professional medical advice because of information accessed through ASN. Call 911 or your doctor for all medical emergencies.

Founded in 1966, and with nearly 16,000 members, the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) leads the fight against kidney disease by educating health professionals, sharing new knowledge, advancing research, and advocating the highest quality care for patients.

American Society of Nephrology

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