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Across the lifespan: Emerging targets to treat mental illness

November 07, 2016

Nov. 7, 2016 - Can understanding differences between women's and men's brains lead to sex-specific treatments for mental illness? Can we apply our knowledge of the brain to the science and practice of 'positive psychiatry,' which seeks to enhance the well-being of people with mental or physical illnesses?

Join us at CAMH's Campbell Family Mental Health Research Symposium to hear keynote talks on these two topics. The annual symposium highlights advances in the neuroscience of mental illness and addictions. This year's theme is Across the Lifespan: Emerging Mechanisms and Targets to Treat Mental Illness.

Keynote speakers are:

Jill M. Goldstein, PhD: Prenatal Stress-Immune Pathways and Risk for Depression and Cardiovascular Disease: Does SeXX Matter
  • Professor of Psychiatry and Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Director of Research at the Connors Center for Women's Health and Gender Biology, Brigham & Women's Hospital


Dilip V. Jeste, MD: Positive Psychiatry: Its Time Has Come
  • Associate Dean for Healthy Aging and Senior Care, Estelle and Edgar Levi Chair in Aging, Director of the Sam and Rose Stein Institute for Research on Aging, Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, UC San Diego


Also featured are scientists from CAMH's Campbell Institute with expertise on youth to late-life mental illnesses: Drs. Stephanie Ameis, Lena Quilty, Yuliya Nikolova, Tarek Rajji, Clement Hamani, Faranak Farzan

WHAT: 2016 Campbell Family Mental Health Research Symposium. Across the Lifespan: Emerging Mechanisms and Targets to Treat Mental Illness

WHEN: Thursday, November 10, 2016, 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

WHERE: Munk School of Global Affairs, 1 Devonshire Place, University of Toronto

View the full schedule: http://www.camh.ca/campbell-symposium
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About the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) is Canada's largest mental health and addiction teaching hospital and a world leading research centre in this field. CAMH combines clinical care, research, education, policy development and health promotion to help transform the lives of people affected by mental illness and addiction. CAMH is fully affiliated with the University of Toronto, and is a Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization Collaborating Centre. For more information, please visit camh.ca or follow @CAMHResearch on Twitter.

CAMH Media Relations Contact: Sean O'Malley; (416) 595-6015 or media@camh.ca

Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

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