White wine, lemon juice combo prevents unwanted discoloration of pastry dough

November 07, 2018

No matter if it's grandma's cookies or commercially produced rolls, pastry lovers expect their baked goods to have a certain "golden brown" allure -- but only after baking. A white dough that changes hue during storage, however, can negatively affect the appearance and perception of the final baked product. Now in a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that they have developed a natural way to prevent discoloration during storage.

Pies, cakes and other pastry doughs are susceptible to enzymatic browning, a chemical process, driven by an enzyme called polyphenol oxidase (PPO). It's the same process that causes bananas and other fruits and vegetables to turn brown. Commercial bakers often prepare dough days or weeks ahead of time, and this type of discoloration could reduce the appeal of the baked product and could lead to economic losses. Commercial additives can help suppress this reaction, but with more and more consumers requesting natural ingredients in their foods, manufacturers are seeking alternative ways to preserve pastries. To address this concern, Peter Fischer and colleagues sought to find a more natural and sustainable way to inhibit enzymatic browning in pastry dough.

The researchers initially tested various synthetic additives and showed that they had different effects on dough. For example, some caused a slight discoloration when initially added, but prevented further discoloration upon storage, while others kept the dough white from the get-go. After a series of experiments with white wine, grape juice and lemon juice, the researchers observed that a combination of white wine and lemon juice did the best job of inhibiting PPO activity and preventing enzymatic browning.
-end-
The authors acknowledge funding from Jowa AG and Swiss Food Research.

The paper's abstract will be available on Nov. 7 at 8 a.m. Eastern time here: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.jafc.8b04477.

The American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society, is a not-for-profit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. ACS is a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related information and research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. ACS does not conduct research, but publishes and publicizes peer-reviewed scientific studies. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

To automatically receive news releases from the American Chemical Society, contact newsroom@acs.org.

Follow us: Twitter | Facebook

American Chemical Society

Related Agricultural Articles from Brightsurf:

Researchers map genomes of agricultural monsters
The University of Cincinnati is unlocking the genomes of creepy agricultural pests like screwworms that feast on livestock from the inside out and thrips that transmit viruses to plants.

Genomes published for major agricultural weeds
Representing some of the most troublesome agricultural weeds, waterhemp, smooth pigweed, and Palmer amaranth impact crop production systems across the US and elsewhere with ripple effects felt by economies worldwide.

Tennessee agricultural sectors taking a hit from COVID-19
The latest research from the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture indicates that the COVID-19 pandemic has affected all aspects of agricultural commodity production and distribution, leading to substantial price declines and reduced income for farmers.

Agricultural pickers in US to see unsafely hot workdays double by 2050
Temperature increases by 2050 and 2100 in U.S. counties where crops are grown will double, then triple the number of unsafe workdays.

Digital agriculture paves the road to agricultural sustainability
In a study published in Nature Sustainability, researchers outline how to develop a more sustainable land management system through data collection and stakeholder buy-in.

Significant potential demonstrated by digital agricultural advice
2019 Economics Nobel Laureate co-publishes paper demonstrating the potential for digital agricultural advice to 'sustainably' raise 'agricultural productivity' at low cost for 2 billion smallholder farming families.

Sustaining roads with grape and agricultural waste
The US spends $5 billion a year to repair damages to road infrastructure from winter snow and ice control operations and the use of traditional deicers.

New report says accelerating global agricultural productivity growth is critical
The 2019 Global Agricultural Productivity Report, released today by Virginia Tech's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, shows agricultural productivity growth -- increasing output of crops and livestock with existing or fewer inputs -- is growing globally at an average annual rate of 1.63%.

The benefits of updating agricultural drainage infrastructure
The massive underground infrastructure that allows farmers to cultivate crops on much of the world's most productive land has outlived its design life and should be updated, according to a new study.

The next agricultural revolution is here
By using modern gene-editing technologies to learn key insights about past agricultural revolutions, two plant scientists are suggesting that the next agricultural revolution could be at hand.

Read More: Agricultural News and Agricultural Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.