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Community house hemodialysis offers many benefits to patients with kidney failure

November 07, 2019

Washington, DC (November 7, 2019) -- Community house hemodialysis may be an attractive form of dialysis for patients with kidney failure. The findings come from a study that will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2019 November 5-November 10 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC.

Community house hemodialysis is a type of home hemodialysis that allows patients to perform hemodialysis independent of nursing or medical supervision in a shared community house. Rachael Walker, PhD (Eastern Institute of Technology, in New Zealand) and her colleagues interviewed 25 patients who used community hemodialysis to gain insights on their perspectives and experiences. Most were of Ma?ori or Pacific ethnicity and in part-time or full-time employment.

The researchers identified 4 themes that described patients' experiences and perspectives of choosing and using community hemodialysis:
  • reducing burden on family (when home isn't an option, minimizing family exposure to dialysis, maintaining privacy and self-identity, reducing the costs of home hemodialysis, gaining a reprieve from home);
  • offering flexibility and freedom (having a normal life, maintaining employment, facilitating travel);
  • control of my health (building independence and self-efficacy, a place of wellness, avoiding institutionalization, creating a culture of extended-hour dialysis);
  • community support (building social connection, supporting peers).
"Community house hemodialysis is a dialysis modality that overcomes many of the socioeconomic barriers to home hemodialysis, is socially and culturally acceptable to Ma?ori and Pacific people, supports extended-hour hemodialysis, and thereby promotes more equitable access to best practice services," said Dr. Walker. "It is therefore a significant addition to independent hemodialysis options available for patients."
-end-
The study was recently published in the National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Medicine. Study: "A home away from home": Patients' experiences of community house hemodialysis: A qualitative study"

ASN Kidney Week 2019, the largest nephrology meeting of its kind, will provide a forum for more than 13,000 professionals to discuss the latest findings in kidney health research and engage in educational sessions related to advances in the care of patients with kidney and related disorders. Kidney Week 2019 will take place November 5 - November 10 in Washington, DC.Since 1966, ASN has been leading the fight to prevent, treat, and cure kidney diseases throughout the world by educating health professionals and scientists, advancing research and innovation, communicating new knowledge, and advocating for the highest quality care for patients. ASN has more than 20,000 members representing 131 countries. For more information, please visit http://www.asn-online.org or contact the society at 202-640-4660.

American Society of Nephrology

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