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Could home remote monitoring improve the health of patients on peritoneal dialysis?

November 07, 2019

Washington, DC (November 7, 2019) -- A recent analysis has examined the potential of a home remote monitoring system to benefit patients on dialysis. The findings will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2019 November 5-November 10 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC.

The use of virtual health technologies can help to monitor and track the health of patients with kidney failure. Martin J. Schreiber, MD (DaVita Inc.) and his colleagues assessed the acceptance and usefulness of home remote monitoring (HRM) in peritoneal dialysis patients using the system.

"The experience with HRM described in our study is, to our knowledge, the largest attempt to leverage this approach in the care of peritoneal dialysis patients," said Dr. Schreiber. Key factors in the successful implementation of the program were: communicating the value of HRM and engaging both healthcare teams and patients, identifying patients for whom remote monitoring may be beneficial, resolving technical issues quickly, and addressing alerts promptly.

"Home remote monitoring has the potential to help prevent hospitalizations and extend the time on peritoneal dialysis for patients who have chosen this treatment modality," said Dr. Schreiber. "Understanding the key elements of a successful program and challenges to implementation is critical to success."
-end-
Study: "Adoption of Home Remote Monitoring to Improve Outcomes in Peritoneal Dialysis (PD) Patients"

ASN Kidney Week 2019, the largest nephrology meeting of its kind, will provide a forum for more than 13,000 professionals to discuss the latest findings in kidney health research and engage in educational sessions related to advances in the care of patients with kidney and related disorders. Kidney Week 2019 will take place November 5 - November 10 in Washington, DC.

Since 1966, ASN has been leading the fight to prevent, treat, and cure kidney diseases throughout the world by educating health professionals and scientists, advancing research and innovation, communicating new knowledge, and advocating for the highest quality care for patients. ASN has more than 20,000 members representing 131 countries. For more information, please visit http://www.asn-online.org or contact the society at 202-640-4660.

American Society of Nephrology

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