Nav: Home

Lifelong medicare coverage of transplant drugs would save money

November 07, 2019

Washington, DC (November 7, 2019) -- Extending Medicare coverage of transplant medications would benefit patients and reduce healthcare costs. The findings come from a study that will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2019 November 5-November 10 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC.

Currently, Medicare provides insurance coverage for anti-rejection medications for only 36 months for all patients who have undergone kidney transplantation. Therefore, unless a patient has another reason to be eligible for Medicare insurance, they will be left without coverage after 3 years. This may lead to patients not being able to afford medications and to subsequent rejection of transplants.

Matthew Kadatz, MD (University of British Columbia) and his colleagues evaluated the costs and effectiveness of extending Medicare coverage of anti-rejection medications to the lifetime of a kidney transplant recipient, assuming this would result in a reduction in transplant rejection and subsequent transplant failure.

In the team's model, the extension of Medicare coverage of anti-rejection medication led to lower costs and an improvement in quality of life for patients who received a kidney transplant.

"This study shows that extending immunosuppression coverage would likely be cost-saving to Medicare assuming it reduces the risk of transplant failure. ?This supports legislation currently being proposed to Congress to extend Medicare coverage of anti-rejection medications for kidney transplant recipients," said Dr. Kadatz. "Further study is needed to evaluate how much benefit is truly obtained from extended anti-rejection coverage if this policy change is implemented."
-end-
Study: "Economic Evaluation of Lifelong Medicare Immunosuppressive Drug Coverage for Kidney Transplant Recipients"

ASN Kidney Week 2019, the largest nephrology meeting of its kind, will provide a forum for more than 13,000 professionals to discuss the latest findings in kidney health research and engage in educational sessions related to advances in the care of patients with kidney and related disorders. Kidney Week 2019 will take place November 5 - November 10 in Washington, DC.

Since 1966, ASN has been leading the fight to prevent, treat, and cure kidney diseases throughout the world by educating health professionals and scientists, advancing research and innovation, communicating new knowledge, and advocating for the highest quality care for patients. ASN has more than 20,000 members representing 131 countries. For more information, please visit http://www.asn-online.org or contact the society at 202-640-4660.

American Society of Nephrology

Related Kidney Transplant Articles:

The economic burden of kidney transplant failure in the United States
A recent analysis published in the American Journal of Transplantation estimates that for the average US patient who has undergone kidney transplantation, failure of the transplanted organ (graft failure) will impose additional medical costs of $78,079 and a loss of 1.66 quality-adjusted life years.
Mixed chimerism improves long-term kidney transplant outlook
Mixed chimerism - the continued mixing of donor and recipient blood cells following a transplant of blood progenitor cells - could improve outcomes for kidney transplant recipients, according to a new clinical study in about 50 patients.
Kidney paired donation is an excellent option for transplant candidates
An analysis compared transplant recipients who received kidneys through national kidney paired donation and those who received kidneys from other living donors (such as relatives, friends or other paired exchange mechanisms).
Mediterranean diet may help preserve the kidney health of transplant recipients
In a study of kidney transplant recipients, those with higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet were less likely to experience kidney function loss.
New blood test can detect rejection by antibodies after kidney transplant
A group of European scientists led by KU Leuven has found a biomarker that can identify patients with symptoms of kidney rejection symptoms after a transplant as a result of antibodies.
Measuring quality of life after pediatric kidney transplant
After receiving a kidney transplant, children may experience worrisome quality-of-life changes that underscore the importance of screening transplant recipients for psychosocial function, according to Children's research presented during the 10th Congress of the International Pediatric Transplant Association.
dnDSA and ethnicity linked with thickening of blood vessels after kidney transplant
Children who developed anti-human leukocyte antibodies against their donor kidney, known as de novo donor-specific antibodies, were more likely to experience carotid intima-media thickening than those without these antibodies, according to preliminary research presented May 7, 2019, during the 10th Congress of the International Pediatric Transplant Association.
Kidney transplant patients need even better aftercare!
Kidney transplantation is the best renal replacement therapy available. Although survival and quality of life are significantly better compared to dialysis patients, transplant recipients nevertheless have a significantly higher cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than healthy people.
Marijuana use has no effect on kidney transplant outcomes
A new study published in Clinical Kidney Journal indicates that the usage of marijuana by kidney donors has no measurable effect upon the outcomes of kidney transplants for donors or recipients.
Frailty may lower kidney failure patients' likelihood of receiving a transplant
Frailty is associated with decreased access at multiple stages in the pathway to kidney transplantation.
More Kidney Transplant News and Kidney Transplant Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans 2.0
More than test scores or good grades–what do kids need for the future? This hour, TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, both during and after this time of crisis. Guests include educators Richard Culatta and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#556 The Power of Friendship
It's 2020 and times are tough. Maybe some of us are learning about social distancing the hard way. Maybe we just are all a little anxious. No matter what, we could probably use a friend. But what is a friend, exactly? And why do we need them so much? This week host Bethany Brookshire speaks with Lydia Denworth, author of the new book "Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond". This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Space
One of the most consistent questions we get at the show is from parents who want to know which episodes are kid-friendly and which aren't. So today, we're releasing a separate feed, Radiolab for Kids. To kick it off, we're rerunning an all-time favorite episode: Space. In the 60's, space exploration was an American obsession. This hour, we chart the path from romance to increasing cynicism. We begin with Ann Druyan, widow of Carl Sagan, with a story about the Voyager expedition, true love, and a golden record that travels through space. And astrophysicist Neil de Grasse Tyson explains the Coepernican Principle, and just how insignificant we are. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.