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Poor sleep may affect cognitive abilities and behavior of children with kidney disease

November 07, 2019

Washington, DC (November 7, 2019) -- Sleep problems and fatigue may affect the cognitive function of children with chronic kidney disease. The findings come from a study that will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2019 November 5-November 10 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC.

Children with chronic kidney disease face a higher risk for experiencing neurocognitive deficits. To examine whether sleep problems or fatigue may play a role, Rebecca Johnson, PhD (Children's Mercy Kansas City) and her colleagues examined clinical trial data related to fatigue, sleep disturbance, low energy, and trouble sleeping in 1,030 children with mild-to-moderate chronic kidney disease.

Among the children in the study, 26% experienced fatigue, 30% reported sleep disturbances, 39% experienced trouble sleeping, and 52% had low energy. Sleep disturbance, trouble sleeping, and low energy were significantly associated with worse parent ratings of overall executive functions (cognitive processes responsible for control of behavior, such as attentional control, inhibition, working memory, and cognitive flexibility). Fatigue and sleep problems were also associated with more parent-reported emotional and behavioral symptoms.  

"Fatigue and sleep problems are prevalent among children with chronic kidney disease and may affect neurocognitive and emotional-behavioral functioning," said Dr. Johnson. "Assessment of sleep problems and fatigue, interventions to improve sleep, and treating medical co-morbidities may promote more positive emotional-behavioral and neurocognitive outcomes for children with chronic kidney disease."
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Study: "Sleep Problems and Fatigue and their Relationships with Emotional-behavioral Symptoms and Neurocognitive Outcomes in Pediatric CKD"

ASN Kidney Week 2019, the largest nephrology meeting of its kind, will provide a forum for more than 13,000 professionals to discuss the latest findings in kidney health research and engage in educational sessions related to advances in the care of patients with kidney and related disorders. Kidney Week 2019 will take place November 5 - November 10 in Washington, DC.

Since 1966, ASN has been leading the fight to prevent, treat, and cure kidney diseases throughout the world by educating health professionals and scientists, advancing research and innovation, communicating new knowledge, and advocating for the highest quality care for patients. ASN has more than 20,000 members representing 131 countries. For more information, please visit http://www.asn-online.org or contact the society at 202-640-4660.

American Society of Nephrology

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