Nav: Home

Poor sleep may affect cognitive abilities and behavior of children with kidney disease

November 07, 2019

Washington, DC (November 7, 2019) -- Sleep problems and fatigue may affect the cognitive function of children with chronic kidney disease. The findings come from a study that will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2019 November 5-November 10 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC.

Children with chronic kidney disease face a higher risk for experiencing neurocognitive deficits. To examine whether sleep problems or fatigue may play a role, Rebecca Johnson, PhD (Children's Mercy Kansas City) and her colleagues examined clinical trial data related to fatigue, sleep disturbance, low energy, and trouble sleeping in 1,030 children with mild-to-moderate chronic kidney disease.

Among the children in the study, 26% experienced fatigue, 30% reported sleep disturbances, 39% experienced trouble sleeping, and 52% had low energy. Sleep disturbance, trouble sleeping, and low energy were significantly associated with worse parent ratings of overall executive functions (cognitive processes responsible for control of behavior, such as attentional control, inhibition, working memory, and cognitive flexibility). Fatigue and sleep problems were also associated with more parent-reported emotional and behavioral symptoms.  

"Fatigue and sleep problems are prevalent among children with chronic kidney disease and may affect neurocognitive and emotional-behavioral functioning," said Dr. Johnson. "Assessment of sleep problems and fatigue, interventions to improve sleep, and treating medical co-morbidities may promote more positive emotional-behavioral and neurocognitive outcomes for children with chronic kidney disease."
-end-
Study: "Sleep Problems and Fatigue and their Relationships with Emotional-behavioral Symptoms and Neurocognitive Outcomes in Pediatric CKD"

ASN Kidney Week 2019, the largest nephrology meeting of its kind, will provide a forum for more than 13,000 professionals to discuss the latest findings in kidney health research and engage in educational sessions related to advances in the care of patients with kidney and related disorders. Kidney Week 2019 will take place November 5 - November 10 in Washington, DC.

Since 1966, ASN has been leading the fight to prevent, treat, and cure kidney diseases throughout the world by educating health professionals and scientists, advancing research and innovation, communicating new knowledge, and advocating for the highest quality care for patients. ASN has more than 20,000 members representing 131 countries. For more information, please visit http://www.asn-online.org or contact the society at 202-640-4660.

American Society of Nephrology

Related Chronic Kidney Disease Articles:

Gap in care found for patients with chronic kidney disease: study
Millions of Canadians living with chronic kidney disease (CKD) may be going without critical testing from their primary care practitioners that would give them a good idea of the severity of the disease so they could intervene earlier with more appropriate care, according to a new study.
Chronic kidney disease epidemic may be result of high heat, toxins
A mysterious epidemic of chronic kidney disease among agricultural workers and manual laborers may be caused by a combination of increasingly hot temperatures, toxins and infections, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
Chronic kidney disease: Everyone's concern
850 million people worldwide are affected by kidney disease. This worrying figure was published last June.
Men with chronic kidney disease have worse outcomes than women
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have found that men with chronic kidney disease, or CKD, are more likely to experience disease progression and death when compared with women suffering from the same condition.
Rates of chronic kidney disease, deaths outpace other diseases
An abundance of high-sugar, high-salt foods in many American diets and obesity-related health problems such as diabetes are likely driving an increase in kidney disease cases, including in young adults, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St.
Revealed: 35 kidney genes linked to chronic kidney disease risk
An international study lead by University of Manchester scientists has discovered the identity of genes that predispose people to chronic kidney disease.
Gout drug may protect against chronic kidney disease
The drug allopurinol used to manage gout may offer protection against the development of kidney disease, according to a new study.
Chronic kidney disease outcomes can be improved by expanding specialist care
Nearly one in seven Americans has chronic kidney disease, and the condition accounts for about 20 percent of the spending by Medicare.
Ovary removal may increase risk of chronic kidney disease
Premenopausal women who have their ovaries surgically removed face an increased risk of developing chronic kidney disease, according to a Mayo Clinic study published on Wednesday, Sept.
Exercise shown to improve symptoms of patients with chronic kidney disease
Leicester's Hospitals and University of Leicester lead research into CKD.
More Chronic Kidney Disease News and Chronic Kidney Disease Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Risk
Why do we revere risk-takers, even when their actions terrify us? Why are some better at taking risks than others? This hour, TED speakers explore the alluring, dangerous, and calculated sides of risk. Guests include professional rock climber Alex Honnold, economist Mariana Mazzucato, psychology researcher Kashfia Rahman, structural engineer and bridge designer Ian Firth, and risk intelligence expert Dylan Evans.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#540 Specialize? Or Generalize?
Ever been called a "jack of all trades, master of none"? The world loves to elevate specialists, people who drill deep into a single topic. Those people are great. But there's a place for generalists too, argues David Epstein. Jacks of all trades are often more successful than specialists. And he's got science to back it up. We talk with Epstein about his latest book, "Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World".
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.