Lecture on anthrax by leading researcher

November 08, 2002

MEDIA ADVISORY

TOPIC: LECTURE ON ANTHRAX BY LEADING RESEARCHER

DATE: Wednesday, November 13, 2002

TIME: 7:25 PM CENTRAL

LOCATION: Tri-Societies Annual Meeting - Indianapolis, Indiana Sagamore Ballroom 3, Indiana Convention Center

CONTACT: Sara Procknow Uttech, The American Society of Agronomy
TEL: 608-273-8090, ext. 323; Mobile: 608-772-0217
E-mail:suttech@agronomy.org

The world-renowned anthrax expert from Northern Arizona University, Dr. Paul S. Keim will present a lecture on the genetic analysis of anthrax on Wednesday, Nov. 13, at the Indiana Convention Center, Sagamore Ballroom 3, second floor.

Dr. Keim was tapped by the federal government last fall to identify and analyze the anthrax strains used in the terrorist mailings. His presentation will be held as part of the Annual Meetings of the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America and Soil Science Society of America in Indianapolis, IN, Nov. 10-14. The Betty Klepper Endowed Lectureship will feature Dr. Keim's presentation, "Pathogen Geonomics: Applications to Epidemiology, Evolution and Forensic Analysis," and begins at 7:25pm, followed by a discussion.

Paul S. Keim, Ph.D., is the Cowden Endowed Chair in Microbiology at Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, and an affiliate researcher at Los Alamos National Laboratory. His research focuses on high-resolution DNA analysis for identification of bacterial pathogens, including anthrax.

The lecture is funded through the Agronomic Science Foundation (ASF) by Betty Klepper.
-end-
The Agronomic Science Foundation (ASF) is the philanthropic arm of the American Society of Agronomy (ASA) www.agronomy.org, the Crop Science Society of America (CSSA) www.crops.org and the Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) www.soils.org. These educational organizations help its 10,000+ members advance the discipline and practice of agronomy, crop and soil sciences by supporting professional growth and science policy initiatives, and by providing quality, research-based publications and a variety of member services.

American Society of Agronomy

Related Anthrax Articles from Brightsurf:

Anthrax may be the next tool in the fight against bladder cancer
Researchers at Purdue University have come up with a way to combine the anthrax toxin with a growth factor to kill bladder cancer cells and tumors.

Stripping down bacterial armor: A new way to fight anthrax
A new study led by Dr. Antonella Fioravanti in the lab of Prof.

New agent against anthrax
A team led by Professor Arne Skerra at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed an innovative strategy for preventing the anthrax bacterium from absorbing iron, which is crucial for its survival.

Researchers engineer dual vaccine against anthrax and plague
A team of researchers has now engineered a virus nanoparticle vaccine against Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis, tier 1 agents that pose serious threats to national security of the United States.

Anthrax: A hidden threat to wildlife in the tropics
Researchers illuminate the epidemiology of a cryptic pathogen.

Anthrax capsule vaccine completely protects monkeys from lethal inhalational anthrax
Vaccination with the anthrax capsule -- a naturally occurring component of the bacterium that causes the disease -- completely protected monkeys from lethal anthrax infection, according to a study published online this week in the journal VACCINE.

Irradiated anthrax can be sequenced -- fast!
These days, mail addressed to selected government offices gets irradiated, in order to kill any biological agents, notably anthrax spores.

Chemists recruit anthrax to deliver cancer drugs
Researchers from MIT have found that with some tinkering, a deadly protein becomes an efficient carrier for antibody drugs.

$14.5 million grant awarded to continue anthrax studies
The National Institutes of Health has awarded the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation a five-year, $14.5 million grant to continue its research on anthrax and the bacteria's effects on humans.

Faster anthrax detection could speed bioterror response
Shortly following the 9/11 terror attack in 2001, letters containing anthrax spores were mailed around the country killing five people and infecting 17 others.

Read More: Anthrax News and Anthrax Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.