NJ black nurses group honors Rutgers College of Nursing EOF Director

November 08, 2005

NEWARK, N.J. - The Mid-State Black Nurses Association of New Jersey will present its Outstanding Educator award to Deborah Walker-McCall, director of the College of Nursing-Educational Opportunity Fund (EOF) program at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. The award ceremony will take place at The Pines Manor in Edison on Nov. 12.

Walker-McCall, who is also director of the Rutgers College of Nursing's Minority Nurse Leadership Institute (MNLI), is receiving the award for her work in the EOF program and the MNLI.

The Rutgers College of Nursing-EOF program is a state sponsored program that provides academic, financial and counseling support to educationally and economically disadvantaged students.

The MNLI is designed to help minority nurses who have a desire to be leaders in the field of nursing. The program provides them with the leadership skills necessary to realize their goals as well as encourages them to pursue advanced degrees.

"I'm humbled, very touched, and, of course, very flattered. It is always a wonderful feeling to be recognized by your peers for the work you love and for your efforts to make a difference," said Walker-McCall, a West Orange resident. "I stand on the shoulders of giants, people who opened the door for me and took me under their wing during my career. My work in the Rutgers College of Nursing's EOF program and the Minority Nurse Leadership Institute in opening the door and helping others to succeed in the nursing profession is something that I always wanted to do."

Walker-McCall has mentored and assisted hundreds of students to obtain their baccalaureate degree and helped registered nurses realize their leadership potential through their involvement in EOF and MNLI.

A native of Newark, Walker-McCall earned her baccalaureate degree from Rutgers College of Nursing, where she was the first African-American to receive the college's Outstanding Senior Award. She received her MBA degree from Rutgers Graduate School of Management.

She is a member of Sigma Theta Tau International, the National League for Nursing, the Rutgers Alumni Association, the New Jersey Educational Opportunity Fund Professional Association, the American Nurses Association, the New Jersey State Nurses Association, the National Black Nurses Association, and the Northern New Jersey Black Nurses Association.

From its headquarters at Rutgers Newark, Rutgers College of Nursing offers a broad range of academic programs on all three Rutgers campuses. The college offers a master's program with unique practitioner specialties and the only doctoral (Ph.D) nursing degree in New Jersey.
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Rutgers University

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