Nav: Home

Capnography training video by BMC published in New England Journal of Medicine

November 08, 2012

(Boston) - Physicians at Boston Medical Center (BMC) have developed a training video for health care providers about how to effectively use capnography to monitor ventilation and carbon dioxide levels for patients under anesthesia or conscious sedation. This is the sixth video published in the New England Journal of Medicine's Videos in Clinical Medicine section produced by BMC. It highlights the importance of using capnography to increase patient safety.

Capnography, which graphically monitors carbon dioxide concentration and measures ventilation and respiration, is utilized in operating rooms, intensive care units and other hospital areas where patients are under anesthesia or receiving sedation. It is being used more frequently because it lets providers know that a patient is breathing effectively.

The video is a useful learning tool for providers familiar with capnography as well as those not familiar with the technology. Utilizing real and simulated patients in a variety of clinical environments, the video demonstrates how to effectively use and manage the equipment. Also included in the video are detailed digital animations of the respiratory and gas exchange process.

The American Society of Anesthesiologists is among several organizations recommending that capnography use be expanded to other clinical areas for patients who are under moderate sedation, eg. patients undergoing a colonoscopy. Capnography also is being used in conjunction with pulse oximeters, which are small, non-invasive sensors placed on a patient's finger or ear to monitor their blood oxygen levels, to capture a more comprehensive picture of respiratory status.

"Using capnography and pulse oximetry technologies together is a powerful approach to monitor the ventilation and gas exchange of patients," said Rafael Ortega, MD, an anesthesiologist at BMC who led the production of the video and served as the lead author of the accompanying paper. "This video provides best practices for health care providers on how to accurately utilize this technology in a variety of clinical settings."
-end-
Ortega is vice chairman of academic affairs of the department of anesthesiology and associate dean of the Office of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM). Chris Connor, MD, PhD, director of research for the department of anesthesiology at BMC and assistant professor of biomedical engineering and anesthesiology at BU; Alex Kotov, MD, anesthesiologist at BMC; Kunal Patel, MD, anesthesiologist BMC; and Sora Kim, MD, a former BUSM medical student, collaborated on the video.

Boston University Medical Center

Related Anesthesia Articles:

Is headache from anesthesia after childbirth associated with risk of bleeding around brain?
This study examined whether postpartum women with headache from anesthesia after neuraxial anesthesia (such as epidural) during childbirth had increased risk of being diagnosed with bleeding around the brain (intracranial subdural hematoma).
Music can be a viable alternative to medications in reducing anxiety before anesthesia
Music is a viable alternative to sedative medications in reducing patient anxiety prior to a peripheral nerve block procedure, according to a new Penn Medicine study.
In cases when patients under anesthesia experience anaphylaxis, hyperactive immune...
A study of 86 patients reveals how drugs used for anesthesia can induce life-threatening anaphylaxis (a dangerous type of allergic reaction) through an alternative immune pathway.
General anesthesia hijacks sleep circuitry to knock you out
In a study published online April 18 in Neuron, researchers found that general anesthesia induces unconsciousness by hijacking the neural circuitry that makes us fall sleep.
Anesthesia sends neurons down the wrong path in unborn rat babies
A study in Cerebral Cortex provides new insight into why -- and when -- anesthesia during pregnancy harms unborn brains.
More Anesthesia News and Anesthesia Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Erasing The Stigma
Many of us either cope with mental illness or know someone who does. But we still have a hard time talking about it. This hour, TED speakers explore ways to push past — and even erase — the stigma. Guests include musician and comedian Jordan Raskopoulos, neuroscientist and psychiatrist Thomas Insel, psychiatrist Dixon Chibanda, anxiety and depression researcher Olivia Remes, and entrepreneur Sangu Delle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...