National nursing conference to address veterans' health needs

November 08, 2012

Tampa, FL (Nov. 8, 2012) - Nursing education and research designed to meet the health needs of veterans, service members and their families will be the focus when he nation's top nurse educators and scientists gather Nov. 13 in Tampa, FL, for a conference hosted by the University of South Florida College of Nursing. The first annual JOINING FORCES TO RESTORE LIVES: Nursing Education and Research in Veterans Health conference will be held at the USF Health Center for Advanced Medical Learning and Simulation (CAMLS) in downtown Tampa.

The conference is part of USF's commitment to support the Joining Forces campaign, a comprehensive national initiative to mobilize all sectors of society to give service members and their families the opportunities and support they have earned.

Keynote speaker James L. Harris, DSN, APRN-BC, MBA, CNL, FAAN, deputy chief nursing officer, Office of Nursing Services, Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), Washington, D.C, will discuss linking nursing education and research to the Joining Forces initiatives. Dr. Harris helps lead the VA's 80,000-plus nursing personnel, but the message he will deliver at the conference is vital to all the nation's registered nurses. While 36 percent of the nation's 23 million veterans receive health care through the VA, the majority seek care outside of the VA health system, usually at local primary care facilities or hospitals in their communities, a 2009 U.S. VA Services report indicates. At 3-million strong, nurses comprise the nation's largest sector of health care professionals.

"The USF College of Nursing is a national leader in educational preparation and nursing research that addresses health care issues unique to service members, veterans and their families," said Dianne Morrison-Beedy, PhD, RN, WHNP-BC, FNAP, FAANP, FAAN, senior associate vice president of USF Health and dean of the College of Nursing. "We are glad to bring our expertise to the table as we join forces with nursing professionals, educators and nurse scientists across the country in a commitment to this important initiative."

Nursing education and research experts presenting at the conference will come from 13 states: Alabama, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Kentucky, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia, Texas and West Virginia.

Attendees at this first-of-its-kind conference will include global nursing executives, scientists, faculty, researchers, educators, advanced practice nurses and registered nurses interested in supporting veterans' health education and research.
-end-
For event and registration information, please visit the USF College of Nursing website: http://health.usf.edu/nursing.

USF Health's mission is to envision and implement the future of health. It is the partnership of the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine, the College of Nursing, the College of Public Health, the College of Pharmacy, the School of Biomedical Sciences and the School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Sciences; and the USF Physician's Group. The University of South Florida is a global research university ranked 50th in the nation by the National Science Foundation for both federal and total research expenditures among all U.S. universities.

The USF College of Nursing RESTORE LIVES - Research and Education to Rehabilitate and Restore the Lives of Veterans, Service Members and their Families - directly impacts the lives of veterans and service members. USF has a long history of supporting our nation's service members, veterans and their families with workforce issues, innovative educational programs and out-of-the-box nursing research conducted by our world class faculty. The USF College of Nursing is Transforming Healthcare, Transforming Lives: Creating the Nursing Leaders of Tomorrow and the Research that Improves Health.

University of South Florida (USF Health)

Related Health Articles from Brightsurf:

The mental health impact of pandemics for front line health care staff
New research shows the impact that pandemics have on the mental health of front-line health care staff.

Modifiable health risks linked to more than $730 billion in US health care costs
Modifiable health risks, such as obesity, high blood pressure, and smoking, were linked to over $730 billion in health care spending in the US in 2016, according to a study published in The Lancet Public Health.

New measure of social determinants of health may improve cardiovascular health assessment
The authors of this study developed a single risk score derived from multiple social determinants of health that predicts county-level cardiovascular disease mortality.

BU study: High deductible health plans are widening racial health gaps
The growing Black Lives Matter movement has brought more attention to the myriad structures that reinforce racial inequities, in everything from policing to hiring to maternal mortality.

Electronic health information exchange improves public health disease reporting
Disease tracking is an important area of focus for health departments in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.

E-health resource improves men's health behaviours with or without fitness facilities
Men who regularly used a free web resource made significantly more health changes than men who did not, finds a new study from the University of British Columbia and Intensions Consulting.

Mental health outcomes among health care workers during COVID-19 pandemic in Italy
Symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety and insomnia among health care workers in Italy during the COVID-19 pandemic are reported in this observational study.

Mental health of health care workers in china in hospitals with patients with COVID-19
This survey study of almost 1,300 health care workers in China at 34 hospitals equipped with fever clinics or wards for patients with COVID-19 reports on their mental health outcomes, including symptoms of depression, anxiety, insomnia and distress.

Health records pin broad set of health risks on genetic premutation
Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Marshfield Clinic have found that there may be a much broader health risk to carriers of the FMR1 premutation, with potentially dozens of clinical conditions that can be ascribed directly to carrying it.

Attitudes about health affect how older adults engage with negative health news
To get older adults to pay attention to important health information, preface it with the good news about their health.

Read More: Health News and Health Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.