Allergy shots during pregnancy may decrease allergies in children

November 08, 2013

BALTIMORE, MD. (November 8, 2013) - Expecting mothers who suffer from allergies may want to consider another vaccination in addition to the flu shot and Tdap. A study being presented at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) found pregnant women who receive allergy shots, also known as immunotherapy, during pregnancy may decrease their baby's chance of developing allergies.

"Our research found trends suggesting women receiving allergy shots either before or during pregnancy reduced their child's chances of having asthma, food allergies, or eczema," said allergist Jay Lieberman, MD, ACAAI member. "Prior studies have suggested that mothers can pass protective factors to their fetus that may decrease their child's chance of developing allergic disease, and these protective factors are increased with allergy immunotherapy."

While there is no cure for the more than 50 million Americans suffering from allergies, immunotherapy is known to modify and prevent disease progression.

According to ACAAI, allergies tend to run in families. If both parents have allergies, their children have a 75 percent chance of being allergic. If only one parent is allergic, or if a relative has allergies, the child has a 30 to 40 percent chance of having an allergy. If neither parent has allergy, the chance of a child developing an allergy is only 10 to15 percent.

"More research is needed to understand if mothers can truly prevent allergies in their children by receiving allergy shots during or before pregnancy," said Dr. Lieberman. "However, these study results show there is a strong association which is very encouraging as allergists explore this possibility."

If a specific allergy is identified and cannot be avoided, or medications are not sufficient, allergists prescribe immunotherapy to control and often eliminate symptoms. Immunity does not occur immediately, but some patients do begin to feel better quickly. Most patients receive monthly injections for three to five years once they reach the maintenance dose.

"Allergy shots are not only effective but cost efficient," said allergist Warner Carr, MD, chair of the ACAAI Immunotherapy and Diagnostics Committee. "Immunotherapy can result in health care savings of 33 to 41 percent."
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The ACAAI Annual Meeting is being held Nov. 7-11 at the Baltimore Convention Center in Baltimore. For more news and research being presented at the meeting, follow the conversation on Twitter #ACAAI.

About ACAAI

The ACAAI is a professional medical organization of more than 5,700 allergists-immunologists and allied health professionals, headquartered in Arlington Heights, Ill. The College fosters a culture of collaboration and congeniality in which its members work together and with others toward the common goals of patient care, education, advocacy and research. ACAAI allergists are board-certified physicians trained to diagnose allergies and asthma, administer immunotherapy, and provide patients with the best treatment outcomes. For more information and to find relief, visit AllergyandAsthmaRelief.org. Join us on Facebook, Pinterest and Twitter.

American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

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