Nav: Home

Survey: Parents should be allowed to be present during trauma care

November 08, 2017

Hospitals that adopt a policy allowing parents in trauma room are seeing the benefits

Orlando, Fla - When a seriously injured child arrives at the trauma center at Orlando Health Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children, the patient's parents are ushered into the trauma room alongside the medical team. The policy to allow parents to be present during care is not the norm among pediatric trauma centers, but a new national survey by Orlando Health shows that the vast majority of people think it should be. The survey found 90 percent agree that parents should be able to stay with their child during treatment for a life-threatening injury or condition.

"Many hospitals are hesitant to allow parents in the trauma room because medical personnel worry they'll be a distraction, but those who have changed their policy have found that not only do parents do just fine in those difficult situations, but their presence is actually very valuable," said Donald Plumley, MD, a pediatric surgeon and medical director for pediatric trauma at Arnold Palmer Hospital. "Parents help guide our critical care decisions by providing information on their child such as allergies, medical history and details on their injury or condition."

Plumley said parents are also able to help keep patients calm, which oftentimes allows the trauma team to forgo sedation or administer less pain medication.

At Arnold Palmer Hospital, parents are accompanied by a dedicated staff member who is there to support them and keep them informed. "While I'm taking care of the child, a chaplain or social worker is taking care of the family and explaining what's happening every step of the way," said Plumley. "It's a partnership that has allowed us to seamlessly integrate parents into trauma procedures."

Traditionally, parents are asked to stay in a separate waiting area, which can add to their anxiety about their child's status. Plumley says it's extremely rare for a parent to choose to wait outside when given the option. "It's very difficult for a parent to watch their child go through an emergency medical situation, but about 95 percent opt to be in the room." he said. "It's much harder for them to be in a waiting area knowing that their child is scared or in pain and not knowing anything about their condition or what is being done to treat them."

Lynette Ancona and Brent Downs experienced this firsthand after they received a phone call that their 10-year-old son, Jonah, had an accident on the school playground and was rushed to the hospital in an ambulance.

"We had very little information when we arrived, but we were able to follow Jonah into the trauma room," said Downs. "The doctor told us exactly what was happening as they took images of Jonah's broken leg and told us that he would have to have surgery."

Jonah's mom says seeing the expertise of everyone in the room helped to put her at ease. "Every single medical professional we came in contact with in that room was doing everything they could to help him, and we weren't excluded from anything," Ancona said. "Seeing the care that he was receiving really helped my confidence level go up."

Plumley says over the past several years of developing the process, parents have become an integral part of trauma care, and he hopes that more hospitals will benefit from including them. "We now feel that parents are part of the team," said Plumley. "When a patient comes in, it's like a well-oiled machine. Every person on the medical staff has their place and their tasks, and that now includes the parents to the point that I look for their input when treating a patient."
-end-
B-ROLL, SOUND BITES, WEB ELEMENTS & HI-RES STILL PHOTOS - Including HD video available for free/unrestricted use by the news media: http://bit.ly/2yUzEIM

Courtesy: Orlando Health Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children

For assistance in downloading, or if you have any questions, contact: shannon@mediasourcetv.com or call: 614.932.9950 or 614.477.2719.

ABOUT ORLANDO HEALTH

Orlando Health is a $3.8 billion not-for-profit healthcare organization and a community-based network of physician practices, hospitals and outpatient care centers across Central Florida. The organization is home to the area's only Level One Trauma Centers for adults and pediatrics, and is a statutory teaching hospital system that offers both specialty and community hospitals, including Lakeland Regional Health Systems, which joined Orlando Health October 1, 2017. More than 3,000 physicians have privileges across the system, which is also one of the area's largest employers with more than 23,000 employees who serve nearly 155,000 inpatients, more than 3 million outpatients, and more than 4,500 international patients each year. Additionally, Orlando Health provides more than $345 million in support of community health needs. More information can be found at http://www.orlandohealth.com.

ABOUT ORLANDO HEALTH ARNOLD PALMER HOSPITAL FOR CHILDREN

Orlando Health Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children, supported by the Arnold Palmer Medical Center Foundation, is a 158-bed facility dedicated exclusively to the needs of children. Located in Orlando, Arnold Palmer Hospital provides expertise in pediatric specialties such as cardiac care, craniomaxillofacial surgery, gastroenterology, nephrology, neurology, oncology, orthopedics, pulmonology and sports medicine. The Bert Martin's Champions for Children Emergency Department & Trauma Center at Arnold Palmer Hospital is part of the only Level One Trauma Center in the area, and is the first facility in Central Florida to provide emergency care exclusively for pediatric patients. Visit http://www.arnoldpalmerhospital.com to learn more about all of our specialties.

Orlando Health Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children

Related Hospitals Articles:

'Best' hospitals should be required to deliver tobacco treatment
A UCLA-led report published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine exposes what the authors call a weakness in the high-profile 'Best Hospitals Honor Roll' published annually by US News and World Report.
Veterans undergoing elective PCI at community hospitals may have increased chance of death compared to those treated at VA hospitals
Veterans who underwent elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for stable angina at a community facility were at a 33% increased hazard, or chance, of death compared to patients treated within the Veterans Affairs (VA) Healthcare System, according to an analysis of nearly 9,000 veterans published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
How should hospitals ask patients for donations?
A new study looks for the first time at patients' views of hospital fundraising, including legally allowable practices that encourage physicians to work with their hospital's fundraising professionals.
Proximity of hospitals to mass shootings in US
Nontrauma center hospitals were the nearest hospitals to most of the mass shootings (five or more people injured or killed by a gun) that happened in the US in 2019.
'Five star' hospitals often provide fewer services than other hospitals, new data suggests
If you're looking for a top-notch hospital with a wide range of services, narrowing your list to hospitals with a five-star patient experience rating might lead you astray.
Costs of care similar or lower at teaching hospitals compared to non-teaching hospitals
Total costs of care are similar or somewhat lower among teaching hospitals compared to non-teaching hospitals among Medicare beneficiaries treated for common medical and surgical conditions, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H.
How common, preventable are sepsis-associated deaths in hospitals?
This study estimates how common sepsis-related deaths are in hospitals and how preventable those deaths might be.
Veterans health administration hospitals outperform non-VHA hospitals in most markets
In a new study, researchers from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice and the White River Junction VA Medical Center in White River Junction, Vermont, used the most current publicly available data to compare health outcomes for VA and non-VA hospitals within 121 local healthcare markets that included both a VA medical center and a non-VA hospital.
Tele-ERs can help strengthen rural hospitals
A new study from the University of Iowa finds rural hospitals that use tele-medicine to back up their emergency room health care providers save money and find it easier to recruit new physicians.
Hospitals may take too much of the blame for unplanned readmissions
A new study out of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center reveals that the preventability of readmissions changes over time: readmissions within the first week after discharge are often preventable by the hospital, whereas readmissions later are often related to patients' difficultly accessing outpatient clinics.
More Hospitals News and Hospitals Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Warped Reality
False information on the internet makes it harder and harder to know what's true, and the consequences have been devastating. This hour, TED speakers explore ideas around technology and deception. Guests include law professor Danielle Citron, journalist Andrew Marantz, and computer scientist Joy Buolamwini.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

What If?
There's plenty of speculation about what Donald Trump might do in the wake of the election. Would he dispute the results if he loses? Would he simply refuse to leave office, or even try to use the military to maintain control? Last summer, Rosa Brooks got together a team of experts and political operatives from both sides of the aisle to ask a slightly different question. Rather than arguing about whether he'd do those things, they dug into what exactly would happen if he did. Part war game part choose your own adventure, Rosa's Transition Integrity Project doesn't give us any predictions, and it isn't a referendum on Trump. Instead, it's a deeply illuminating stress test on our laws, our institutions, and on the commitment to democracy written into the constitution. This episode was reported by Bethel Habte, with help from Tracie Hunte, and produced by Bethel Habte. Jeremy Bloom provided original music. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.     You can read The Transition Integrity Project's report here.