North Korean nuclear test measured in southwest Germany

November 08, 2017

The recent nuclear test by the regime in North Korea was even measurable in Southwest Germany. Two seismic stations run by scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in the Karlsruhe city center and in Durlach recorded vibrations of 6.3 in body wave magnitude in the night from Saturday to Sunday.

"This corresponds to about a moderate earthquake," Toni Zieger of KIT's Geophysical Institute (GPI) says. "However, the detonation could not be felt here," Zieger explains. The stations that belong to the Karlsruhe Wide Band Array (KABBA) run by GPI are equipped with highly sensitive measurement instruments that perceive shocks worldwide. According to the Helmholtz Centre Potsdam (GFZ), the detonation in North Korea took place at 5.30 am (MEST) in the night from Saturday to Sunday. About twelve minutes later, the seismic waves arrived in Karlsruhe. They made the ground in Karlsruhe rise and subside by about one micrometer.
-end-
For further information, please contact: Dr. Felix Mescoli, Press Officer, Phone: +49 721 608-48120, Fax: +49 721 608-43658, Email: felix.mescoli@kit.edu

Being "The Research University in the Helmholtz Association," KIT creates and imparts knowledge for the society and the environment. It is the objective to make significant contributions to the global challenges in the fields of energy, mobility and information. For this, about 9,300 employees cooperate in a broad range of disciplines in natural sciences, engineering sciences, economics, and the humanities and social sciences. KIT prepares its 26,000 students for responsible tasks in society, industry, and science by offering research-based study programs. Innovation efforts at KIT build a bridge between important scientific findings and their application for the benefit of society, economic prosperity, and the preservation of our natural basis of life.

Since 2010, the KIT has been certified as a family-friendly university.

This press release is available on the internet at http://www.sek.kit.edu/english/press_office.php.

Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT)

Related Detonation Articles from Brightsurf:

Study reveals robust performance in aged detonator explosive
High-speed video (39,000 frames per second) of the initiation of a detonator holding 40 milligrams of PETN, encased in an acrylic holder.

Hubble watches exploding star fade into oblivion
When a star unleashes as much energy in a matter of days as our Sun does in several billion years, you know it's not going to remain visible for long.

A rapid finger-stick blood test quickly estimates radiation exposure in mice
A new finger-stick test can use a single drop of blood to quickly estimate how much harmful radiation mice have been exposed to, according to a study.

Protecting Earth from asteroid impact with a tethered diversion
A new paper published in EPJ Special Topics, co-authored by Flaviane Venditti, Planetary Radar Department, Arecibo Observatory, University of Central Florida, Arecibo, suggests the use of a tether assisted system to prevent PHA impact.

Theory of detonation-driven hypervelocity shock tunnels and its demonstration
The hypersonic ground testing is a critical issue for hypersonics.

UCF researchers develop groundbreaking new rocket-propulsion system
A University of Central Florida researcher and his team have developed an advanced new rocket-propulsion system once thought to be impossible.

Simple, fuel-efficient rocket engine could enable cheaper, lighter spacecraft
University of Washington researchers have developed a mathematical model that describes how rotating detonation engines work.

Americans perceive likelihood of nuclear weapons risk as 50/50 tossup
It has been 30 years since the end of the Cold War, yet on average, Americans still perceive that the odds of a nuclear weapon detonating on U.S. soil is as likely as a coin toss, according to new research from Stevens Institute of Technology.

New study sheds light on conditions that trigger supernovae explosions
For the first time, researchers were able to demonstrate the process of detonation formation using both experiments and numerical simulations carried out on supercomputers.

UCF researchers discover mechanisms for the cause of the Big Bang
The origin of the universe started with the Big Bang, but how the supernova explosion ignited has long been a mystery -- until now.

Read More: Detonation News and Detonation Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.