Once-daily INTUNIV (guanfacine) extended release tablets now available in US pharmacies

November 09, 2009

PHILADELPHIA - November 9, 2009 - Shire plc (LSE: SHP, NASDAQ: SHPGY), the global specialty biopharmaceutical company, today announced the availability of INTUNIV™ (guanfacine) Extended Release Tablets in pharmacies across the United States for the treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents ages 6 to 17. INTUNIV, a once-daily formulation of guanfacine, is the first and only nonscheduled alpha-2A receptor agonist approved for the treatment of ADHD. In clinical trials, INTUNIV provided significant efficacy across the spectrum of ADHD symptoms that can be disruptive, such as being easily distracted, interrupting others, running around excessively, arguing with adults, and losing temper.

"INTUNIV has been shown to improve a range of ADHD symptoms and provides prescribers and patients with another treatment option for this complex disorder," said Rakesh Jain, MD, MPH, Director of Psychopharmacology Research at R/D Clinical Research, Inc, in Lake Jackson, Texas. "In clinical studies, INTUNIV was shown to provide significant ADHD symptom improvement across a full day, as reported by parents at approximately 6 PM, 8 PM, and 6 AM the next morning. These findings suggest that INTUNIV may be an important treatment option for children and adolescents with ADHD who are faced with the complexities of the disorder, both at school and at home. Because of this, many clinicians such as myself, have been highly anticipating its availability."

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved INTUNIV on September 2, 2009. Once-daily INTUNIV is now available in US pharmacies in four dosage strengths (1 mg, 2 mg, 3 mg, and 4 mg) and is marketed in the United States by the existing Shire ADHD sales team of nearly 600 representatives. INTUNIV is not a controlled substance and has no known potential for abuse or dependence.

"INTUNIV is the newest ADHD treatment to receive FDA approval and the latest addition to the Shire ADHD portfolio. The availability of INTUNIV now allows physicians to prescribe the first and only nonscheduled alpha-2A receptor agonist indicated for the treatment of ADHD to help their patients manage a range of ADHD symptoms," said Michael Yasick, Senior Vice President of the ADHD Business Unit at Shire. "Shire is proud to provide physicians and the ADHD community with a novel treatment choice, which expands the range of available treatment options, allowing physicians to optimize the management of ADHD."

The commitment of Shire to making INTUNIV available for ADHD patients is consistent with the company's strategy to expand and diversify its ADHD portfolio, which now consists of four ADHD treatment options of scheduled and nonscheduled medicines in the United States and three medicines approved for the treatment of ADHD outside the United States.

About INTUNIV

The efficacy of INTUNIV in the treatment of ADHD was established in two, similarly designed, placebo-controlled clinical trials in children and adolescents aged 6 to 17 years who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV (DSM-IV®) criteria for ADHD. Statistically significant improvements were reported by investigators, parents, and teachers.

The first pivotal trial was a phase III, double-blind, parallel-group trial, in which investigators randomized 345 children aged 6 to 17 years to either a placebo or a fixed 2-mg, 3-mg, or 4-mg dose of INTUNIV given once daily during an eight-week period. The second pivotal trial was a phase III, double-blind, parallel-group trial, in which investigators randomized 324 children aged 6 to 17 years to either a placebo or a fixed 1-mg, 2-mg, 3-mg, or 4-mg dose of INTUNIV given once daily during a nine-week period, with the 1 mg assigned only to patients weighing less than 50 kg (110 lbs).

In both trials, doses were increased in increments of 1 mg per week, and investigators evaluated participants' signs and symptoms of ADHD on a once-weekly basis using the clinician administered and scored ADHD Rating Scale-IV (ADHD-RS-IV), a scale frequently used in ADHD clinical trials that assesses hyperactive, impulsive, and inattentive symptoms. The primary outcome was the change in total ADHD-RS-IV scores from baseline to end point in both studies.

Both trials demonstrated statistically significant improvements in ADHD-RS-IV scores in patients taking INTUNIV beginning one to two weeks after patients began receiving once-daily doses of INTUNIV. In the first pivotal trial, the mean reduction in ADHD-RS-IV total scores at end point were -16.7 for INTUNIV compared to -8.9 for placebo (P< .0001); the mean reduction in ADHD-RS-IV total scores in the second pivotal trial were -19.6 for INTUNIV and -12.2 for placebo (P=.0040). Placebo-adjusted LS mean changes from baseline were statistically significant for all INTUNIV doses in the randomized treatment groups in both studies.

Additional secondary efficacy outcome measures included the Conners' Parent Rating Scale-Revised: Short Form (CPRS-R) and the Conners' Teacher Rating Scale-Revised: Short Form (CTRS-R). CPRS-R and CTRS-R are comprehensive scales that use parent and teacher observer and self-report ratings to help assess ADHD symptoms and behaviors in children and adolescents. Among some of the symptoms measured were: inattentiveness/being easily distracted, running around or climbing excessively, arguing with adults, losing temper, and interrupting or intruding on others. Significant improvements in mean day total scores were seen on both scales: based on the CPRS-R, parents reported significant improvement across a full day (as measured at 6 PM, 8 PM, and 6 AM the next morning); based on the CTRS-R, which was used only in the first pivotal trial, teachers reported significant improvement throughout the school day (as measured at 10 AM and 2 PM).

Safety was also evaluated during these pivotal trials and safety data showed that adverse events reported by participants using INTUNIV were generally mild to moderate in severity. Treatment-related adverse events greater than 10 percent included somnolence (32 percent), headache (26 percent), fatigue (18 percent), upper abdominal pain (14 percent), and sedation (13 percent). Sedation-related, treatment emergent adverse events were among the most common and were usually transient and mild to moderate in severity. Small to modest changes in blood pressure, pulse rate, and ECG parameters were observed.
-end-
Additional information about INTUNIV and Full Prescribing Information are available at http://www.intuniv.com.

Important Safety Information

INTUNIV is indicated for the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents aged 6 to 17. Efficacy was established in two controlled clinical trials (8 and 9 weeks in duration). The physician electing to use INTUNIV for extended periods should periodically reevaluate its long-term usefulness for the individual patient.

INTUNIV should not be used in patients with a history of hypersensitivity to guanfacine or any of its inactive ingredients or by patients taking other products containing guanfacine.

Hypotension, bradycardia, and syncope were observed in clinical trials. Use INTUNIV with caution in treating patients who have experienced hypotension, bradycardia, heart block, or syncope, or who may have a condition that predisposes them to syncope; are treated concomitantly with antihypertensives or other drugs that can reduce blood pressure or heart rate or increase the risk of syncope. Heart rate and blood pressure should be measured prior to initiation of therapy, following dose increases, and periodically while on therapy. Patients should be advised to avoid becoming dehydrated or overheated.

Sedation and somnolence were commonly observed in clinical trials. The potential for additive sedative effects with CNS depressant drugs should be considered. Patients should be cautioned against operating heavy equipment or driving until they know how they respond to INTUNIV. Avoid use with alcohol.

Common adverse reactions in patients taking INTUNIV that may be dose related over the range of 1 to 4 mg/day include somnolence, sedation, abdominal pain, dizziness, hypotension/decreased blood pressure, dry mouth, and constipation.

About ADHD

ADHD is one of the most common psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents. Worldwide prevalence of ADHD is estimated at 5.3 percent (with large variability), according to a comprehensive systematic review of this topic published in 2007 in the American Journal of Psychiatry. In the United States, approximately 7.8 percent of all school-aged children, or about 4.4 million children aged 4 to 17 years, have been diagnosed with ADHD at some point in their lives, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

ADHD is a psychiatric behavioral disorder that manifests as a persistent pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity that is more frequent and severe than is typically observed in individuals at a comparable level of development. The specific etiology of ADHD is unknown and there is no single diagnostic test for this disorder. Adequate diagnosis requires the use of medical and special psychological, educational and social resources, utilizing diagnostic criteria such as Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV (DSM-IV®) or International Classification of Diseases 10 (ICD-10).

Although there is no cure for ADHD, there are accepted treatments that specifically target its symptoms. Standard treatments include educational approaches, psychological or behavioral modification, and/or medication.

For further information please contact:

Investor Relations
Cléa Rosenfeld (Rest of the World)
+44 1256 894 160
Eric Rojas (North America)
+1 617 551 9715

Media
Jessica Mann (Rest of the World)
+44 1256 894 280
Matthew Cabrey (North America)
+1 484 595 8248
Debra Gemme (Porter Novelli for Shire)
+1 212 601 8342

SHIRE PLC

Shire's strategic goal is to become the leading specialty biopharmaceutical company that focuses on meeting the needs of the specialist physician. Shire focuses its business on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), human genetic therapies (HGT) and gastrointestinal (GI) diseases as well as opportunities in other therapeutic areas to the extent they arise through acquisitions. Shire's in-licensing, merger and acquisition efforts are focused on products in specialist markets with strong intellectual property protection and global rights. Shire believes that a carefully selected and balanced portfolio of products with strategically aligned and relatively small-scale sales forces will deliver strong results.

For further information on Shire, please visit the Company's Web site: http://www.shire.com.

THE "SAFE HARBOR" STATEMENT UNDER THE PRIVATE SECURITIES LITIGATION REFORM ACT OF 1995

Statements included herein that are not historical facts are forward-looking statements. Such forward-looking statements involve a number of risks and uncertainties and are subject to change at any time. In the event such risks or uncertainties materialize, the Company's results could be materially adversely affected. The risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, risks associated with: the inherent uncertainty of research, development, approval, reimbursement, manufacturing and commercialization of the Company's Specialty Pharmaceutical and Human Genetic Therapies products, as well as the ability to secure and integrate new products for commercialization and/or development; government regulation of the Company's products; the Company's ability to manufacture its products in sufficient quantities to meet demand; the impact of competitive therapies on the Company's products; the Company's ability to register, maintain and enforce patents and other intellectual property rights relating to its products; the Company's ability to obtain and maintain government and other third-party reimbursement for its products; and other risks and uncertainties detailed from time to time in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Porter Novelli

Related ADHD Articles from Brightsurf:

Autism and ADHD share genes
Researchers from the national psychiatric project iPSYCH have found that autism and ADHD share changes in the same genes.

ADHD across racial/ethnic groups
This study of patients from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds who received care at the Kaiser Permanente Northern California health system looked at how common attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnoses were over a 10-year period across seven racial/ethnic groups.

Cycles of reward: New insight into ADHD treatment
Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) in collaboration with scientists at the University of Otago and the University of Auckland in New Zealand, investigated the actions of the drug in rats.

Young mums more likely to have kids with ADHD
Young mothers have a greater chance of having a child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) according to new research from the University of South Australia.

ADHD medication: How much is too much for a hyperactive child?
When children with ADHD don't respond well to Methylphenidate (MPH, also known as Ritalin) doctors often increase the dose.

Antipsychotic use in youths with ADHD is low, but still cause for concern
A new study eased fears about the proportion of youths with ADHD taking antipsychotic drugs, but still found that many prescriptions may be inappropriate.

How stimulant treatment prevents serious outcomes of ADHD
Analysis quantifies the extent which stimulant treatment reduces serious outcomes in children and young adults with ADHD.

Did Leonardo da Vinci have ADHD?
Leonardo da Vinci produced some of the world's most iconic art, but historical accounts show that he struggled to complete his works.

More sleep may help teens with ADHD focus and organize
Teenagers with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may benefit from more sleep to help them focus, plan and control their emotions.

Researchers have found the first risk genes for ADHD
A major international collaboration headed by researchers from the Danish iPSYCH project, the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Massachusetts General Hospital, SUNY Upstate Medical University, and the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium has for the first time identified genetic variants which increase the risk of ADHD.

Read More: ADHD News and ADHD Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.