An egg a day to keep allergies away

November 09, 2012

ANAHEIM, CA. (November 9, 2012) - Avoiding sweet treats like pumpkin bread and cookies this holiday season might not be necessary for children with egg allergies. New studies presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting found 56 percent of allergic children can tolerate baked hen's egg, while 55 percent outgrow their egg allergy entirely.

"More than half of egg allergic children can tolerate hen's eggs when they are baked at 350 degrees in products such as cakes and breads," said allergist Rushani Saltzman, M.D., lead study author and ACAAI member. "Dietary introduction of baked egg by an allergist can broaden a child's diet, improve quality of life and likely accelerate the development of an egg tolerance."

The median dose tolerated was 2⁄5 baked hen's egg. The products tested were all baked at 350 degrees for a minimum of 30 minutes.

In a separate study also presented at the meeting, Ruchi Gupta, M.D., lead study author and pediatrician, found that out of the eight common food allergens, children most commonly outgrew egg allergy.

"Food tolerance was observed in one in four children, with 55 percent outgrowing their egg allergy by age seven," said Dr. Gupta. "Developing an egg tolerance is the most common for children, followed by milk. A small proportion outgrew shellfish and tree nut allergies."

If children have shown a severe reaction to eggs in the past they are less likely to outgrow the allergy, according to researchers. Severe symptoms include rapid swelling of the skin and tissue, difficulty breathing and life-threatening anaphylaxis.

"While these studies show many positive findings for children with egg allergy, parents must practice caution," said allergist Richard Weber, M.D., ACAAI president-elect. "Introducing an allergen back into a child's diet can have severe consequences, and only should be done under the care of a board-certified allergist."
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Parents can find a board-certified allergist in their area at AllergyAndAsthmaRelief.org. More news and research from the annual meeting, being held Nov. 8-13, 2012 in Anaheim, Calif. can be followed via Twitter at #ACAAI.

About ACAAI

The ACAAI is a professional medical organization of more than 5,700 allergists-immunologists and allied health professionals, headquartered in Arlington Heights, Ill. The College fosters a culture of collaboration and congeniality in which its members work together and with others toward the common goals of patient care, education, advocacy and research. ACAAI allergists are board-certified physicians trained to diagnose allergies and asthma, administer immunotherapy, and provide patients with the best treatment outcomes. For more information and to find relief, visit www.AllergyandAsthmaRelief.org. Join us on Facebook and Twitter.

The ACAAI Press Room is located in Room 304B at the Anaheim Convention Center, Nov. 9-12, 2012. To arrange an interview, please contact Christine Westendorf, ACAAI Media Relations Manager, at 847-427-1200 or ChristineWestendorf@acaai.org

American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

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