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Reservoirs are a major source of greenhouse gases

November 09, 2016

The BioScience Talks podcast features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences.

Over 1 million dams exist worldwide. These structures have numerous environmental effects, and there is no shortage of research on the various ecological consequences of dams. But there is another major threat arising from dammed waters: the release of greenhouse gases. For this episode of BioScience Talks, we spoke with Dr. Bridget Deemer of the US Geological Survey. Deemer and her colleagues recently embarked on a systematic effort to synthesize reservoir greenhouse-gas data. The results, described in BioScience, point to reservoirs as a substantial yet often unrecognized source of greenhouse gas emission.

To hear the whole discussion, visit this link for this latest episode of the Bioscience Talks podcast.
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American Institute of Biological Sciences

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Reservoirs are a major source of greenhouse gases
The BioScience Talks podcast (http://bioscience.libsyn.com) features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences
Reservoirs are a major source of greenhouse gases
Dammed rivers are often considered environmentally friendly, carbon-neutral energy sources, but the reservoirs they create release large amounts of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere.
Controlled Colorado River flooding released stored greenhouse gases
The 2014 experimental controlled pulse of water to the Colorado River Delta has revealed an interesting twist on how large dry watercourses may respond to short-term flooding events: the release of stored greenhouse gases.
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