High blood pressure complications in US pregnancies have nearly doubled

November 09, 2020

DALLAS, Nov. 9, 2020 -- Nearly twice as many pregnancies were complicated by high blood pressure in 2018 than in 2007, and women living in rural areas continue to have higher rates of high blood pressure compared to their urban counterparts, according to preliminary research to be presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2020. The meeting will be held virtually, Friday, November 13 - Tuesday, November 17, 2020, and is a premier global exchange of the latest scientific advancements, research and evidence-based clinical practice updates in cardiovascular science for health care.

Pre-pregnancy hypertension is a well-established risk to the health of both mothers and infants, and mortality rates of mothers are increasing in the U.S. with significant rural-urban disparities. The goal of the study, "Trends and Disparities in Pre-pregnancy Essential Hypertension Among Women in Rural and Urban United States, 2007-2018," was to detail trends in maternal pre-pregnancy high blood pressure so geographically targeted prevention and policy strategies can be developed.

"We were surprised to see the dramatic increase in the percentage over the last 10 years of women entering pregnancy with hypertension. It was also shocking to see women as young as 15 to 24 years old with high blood pressure, and the statistics were worse in rural areas, leading us to be concerned these numbers may, in part, be driven by hospital closures and difficulty accessing care," said the study's lead author Natalie A. Cameron, M.D., a resident in the department of medicine at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

Researchers collected maternal data from almost 50 million live births in women ages 15 to 44, between 2007 and 2018, from the national CDC Natality Database. They calculated rates of pre-pregnancy hypertension per 1,000 live births overall and by the type of community the women lived in (rural or urban). The annual percentage change was calculated to compare yearly rates between rural and urban settings.

Results from the analysis indicate:"These data demonstrate unacceptable increases in the number of women with hypertension that need to be addressed urgently," says Cameron. "Preventive care must start before pregnancy. This is especially important in rural communities where there is a far greater burden of high blood pressure and much higher risks to the health of mother and baby. We also must address the structural and systemic racism that can be barriers to high quality care."

Important limitations of this work include the lack of data on continuous blood pressure measurements, as well as other important factors that can be related to high blood pressure such as body mass index.
-end-
Co-authors are Rebecca Molsberry, M.P.H.; Jacob B. Pierce, B.A.; Amanda M. Perak, M.D., M.S.; William A. Grobman, M.D., M.B.A.; Norrina B. Allen, Ph.D.; Philip Greenland, M.D.; Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, M.D., Sc.M.; and Sadiya S. Khan, M.D., M.Sc. Author disclosures are in the abstract.

Authors reported this study was funded by the National Institutes of Health's National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the American Heart Association

Note: Session: LF.AOS,487; Scientific presentation #209 is being presented at 9:00 a.m. CT, Friday, Nov. 13, 2020.

Additional Resources:

Multimedia, including a video perspective interview with American Heart Association volunteer expert, Karen Joynt Maddox, M.D., MPH, may be downloaded from the right column of the release link https://newsroom.heart.org/news/high-blood-pressure-complications-in-u-s-pregnancies-have-nearly-doubled?preview=8ff58d2d5e7353d318b436f93ef19ead

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For more news at AHA Scientific Sessions 2020, follow us on Twitter @HeartNews #AHA20.

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