Campus-community interventions successful in reducing college drinking

November 10, 2010

San Diego, CA, November 10, 2010 - Heavy drinking among college students results in over 1800 deaths each year, as well as 590,000 unintentional injuries, almost 700,000 assaults and more than 97,000 victims of sexual assaults. In a new study published in the December issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, researchers report on the results of the Safer California Universities study, a successful community-wide prevention strategy targeted at off-campus settings. This is one of the first studies to focus on the total environment rather than on prevention aimed at individuals.

The authors found significant reductions in the incidence and likelihood of intoxication at off-campus parties and bars/restaurants for Safer intervention universities. Students from Safer universities were 6% less likely to drink to intoxication during the last time they were at any of the targeted settings, 9% for off-campus parties, and 15% for bars/restaurants. There was also evidence that drinking was reduced at fraternities and sororities. These declines were equivalent to 6,000 fewer incidents of intoxication at off-campus parties and 4,000 fewer incidents at bars & restaurants during the fall semester at each intervention schools relative to controls. Furthermore, stronger intervention effects were achieved at Safer universities with the highest level of implementation.

"These findings should give college administrators some degree of optimism that student drinking is amenable to a combination of well-chosen, evidence-based universal prevention strategies," commented lead investigator Robert F. Saltz, PhD, Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation (PIRE), Berkeley, CA. "Here, one set of alcohol control strategies was found to be efficacious, but other combinations may work as well, or even better. With a growing body of such evidence, and combined with strategies already shown to be effective, it will be possible to craft a comprehensive prevention program that ratchets down the harm currently produced by alcohol use on and near college campuses."

The Safer California Universities study involved 8 campuses of the University of California and 6 campuses in the California State University system. Half of these schools were randomly assigned to the Safer intervention, which took place in the fall semesters of 2005 and 2006. Student surveys were completed by undergraduates in four fall semesters (2003 through 2006) and random samples of 1,000 to 2,000 students per campus per year were analyzed. Students were asked about where they drank, whether they had gotten drunk, and whether they had engaged in so-called "binge drinking." They were also questioned about their grade point averages and their general health, as well as other sociodemographic characteristics.

Safer environmental interventions included nuisance party enforcement operations, minor decoy operations, DUI checkpoints, social host ordinances, and use of campus and local media to increase the visibility of environmental strategies. Intervention campuses differed in their level of implementation, but all concentrated on off-campus activities for drinking.
-end-
Kenny Goldberg, Health Reporter for KPBS Radio, 89.5 FM in San Diego, interviewed lead investigator Robert J. Saltz. Go to http://www.ajpm-online.net/content/podcast_collection to listen to this podcast.

The article is "Alcohol Risk Management in College Settings: The Safer California Universities Randomized Trial" by Robert F. Saltz, PhD; Mallie J. Paschall, PhD; Richard P. McGaffigan, MSW; and Peter M. Nygaard, PhD. It appears in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Volume 39, Issue 6 (December 2010) published by Elsevier. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2010.08.020

This research was made possible by a grant from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) with supplemental funding from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

Elsevier Health Sciences

Related Alcohol Articles from Brightsurf:

Alcohol use changed right after COVID-19 lockdown
One in four adults reported a change in alcohol use almost immediately after stay-at-home orders were issued: 14% reported drinking more alcohol and reported higher levels of stress and anxiety than those who did not drink and those whose use stayed the same.

Changes in hospitalizations for alcohol use disorder in US
Changes over nearly two decades in the rate of hospitalizations and in-hospital deaths from alcohol use disorder in the US were examined in this study.

Associations of alcohol consumption, alcohol-induced passing out with risk of dementia
The risk of future dementia associated with overall alcohol consumption and alcohol-induced loss of consciousness in a population of current drinkers was examined in this observational study with more than 131,000 adults.

New alcohol genes uncovered
Do you have what is known as problematic alcohol use?

Does estrogen influence alcohol use disorder?
A new study from researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago shows that high estrogen levels may make alcohol more rewarding to female mice.

Sobering new data on drinking and driving: 15% of US alcohol-related motor vehicle fatalities involve alcohol under the legal limit
A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, found that motor vehicle crashes involving drivers with blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) below the legal limit of 0.08 percent accounted for 15% of alcohol-involved crash deaths in the United States.

Alcohol-induced deaths in US
National vital statistics data from 2000 to 2016 were used to examine how rates of alcohol-induced deaths (defined as those deaths due to alcohol consumption that could be avoided if alcohol weren't involved) have changed in the US and to compare the results by demographic groups including sex, race/ethnicity, age, socioeconomic status and geographic location.

Cuts in alcohol duty linked to 2000 more alcohol-related deaths in England
Government cuts to alcohol taxes have had dramatic consequences for public health, including nearly 2000 more alcohol-related deaths in England since 2012, according to new research from the University of Sheffield's School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR).

Integrated stepped alcohol treatment for people in HIV care improves both HIV & alcohol outcomes
Increasing the intensity of treatment for alcohol use disorder (AUD) over time improves alcohol-related outcomes among people with HIV, according to new clinical research supported by the National Institutes of Health.

The Lancet:Targets to reduce harmful alcohol use are likely to be missed as global alcohol intake increases
Increasing rates of alcohol use suggest that the world is not on track to achieve targets against harmful alcohol use, according to a study of 189 countries' alcohol intake between 1990-2017 and estimated intake up to 2030, published in The Lancet.

Read More: Alcohol News and Alcohol Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.