LSU's Jayne Garno receives early career award from President

November 10, 2010

BATON ROUGE - Jayne Garno, LSU associate professor of chemistry in the College of Science, has been awarded the United States government's highest honor for scientists and engineers in the early stages of their independent research careers: the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, or PECASE.

"I am very honored to have received such a prestigious award. LSU is a rich environment for accomplishing nanoscience research using state-of-the-art instruments," said Garno. "My group has gained national prominence because I work with excellent people, diverse teams of highly creative and talented students and collaborators."

Only 100 recipients are honored with the PECASE annually. Awardees are selected on the basis of two criteria: pursuit of innovative research at the frontiers of science and technology and a commitment to community service as demonstrated through scientific leadership, public education, or community outreach. Winning scientists and engineers receive up to a five-year research grant to further their study in support of critical government missions

Garno is recognized for her exemplary achievements, including the receipt of a National Science Foundation, or NSF, CAREER Award, one of the most prestigious early career awards available through the foundation. As part of her ongoing research, Garno focuses on new measurements with atomic force microscopy, or AFM, and has invented a new method for mapping magnetic domains at nanometer dimensions, which provides the ultimate sensitivity for measuring magnetic properties at the level of individual nanoparticles or iron-containing protein. Combining nanolithography with AFM experiments provides a way to make measurements at the molecular and atomic level. Her group has also developed innovative methods of nanolithography, using physical and chemical approaches to arrange molecules and nanomaterials on surfaces in defined locations.

"We are proud to call Dr. Jayne Garno one of our own," said LSU Chancellor Michael Martin. "Being recognized at this high level for excelling in chemistry research and advancement is an outstanding achievement. We applaud Dr. Garno for her hard work and effort. She, like many of our other faculty members, helps LSU maintain its national status."

The Presidential Early Career Awards embody the high priority the administration places on producing outstanding scientists and engineers to advance the nation's goals and contribute to all sectors of the economy. The awards, established by President Clinton in February 1996, are coordinated by the Office of Science and Technology Policy within the Executive Office of the President.
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Related Links:

NSF CAREER Grant Series: LSU Researcher Seeks New Ways to Measure Nanomagnetism

LSU's Jayne Garno Selected as Camille-Dreyfus Teacher Scholar

Louisiana State University

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