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ASHG Webinar Series: Genetic Testing in Children and Adolescents

November 10, 2016

WHEN:

Nov. 17, 2016; Jan. 19, 2017; and March 16, 2017

WHERE:

Online: https://www.pathlms.com/ashg/courses/3497

WHAT:

This series of three free webinars, intended for primary care providers and specialists who treat children and adolescents, will help fill clinical gaps by teaching best practices in genetic testing. The one-hour webinars will address risk management, benefits and limitations of testing, test interpretation, referral, communication, and management. Continuing medical education (CME) credit will be available.

Thursday, Nov. 17, 2016, 1:00-2:00 pm Eastern: When and How to Test

Thursday, Jan. 19, 2017, 1:00-2:00 pm Eastern: Testing Methods and Results

Thursday, March 16, 2017, 1:00-2:00 pm Eastern: Communication and Management

HOW:

Registration, free of charge and open until the start of the event: https://www.pathlms.com/ashg/courses/3497/sections/4943

DETAILS:

For additional information and an agenda, visit: https://www.pathlms.com/ashg/courses/3497/sections/4943

ASHG (2015). Points to consider: Ethical, legal, and psychosocial implications of genetic testing in children and adolescents. American Journal of Human Genetics.

ASHG (2016). Infographics: Pediatric genetic testing: http://www.ashg.org/education/infographics.shtml#pediatric
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American Society of Human Genetics

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Does genetic testing pose psychosocial risks?
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Genetic testing has a data problem; New software can help
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