Smokers may want to kick butt before dental procedures

November 11, 2003

CHICAGO - Swedish researchers may have found why tobacco smoking impairs the outcome of surgical and non-surgical periodontal therapy. According to the findings published in the Journal of Periodontology, smokers will want to quit before oral surgery in preparation for a prompt recovery.

"In this study we investigated the relationship between tobacco smoking and the inflammatory response in smokers who consumed 10 to 20 cigarettes per day," said Michael P. Rethman, D.D.S., M.S., and president of the American Academy of Periodontology (AAP). "What we found in tobacco smokers is that the body's defense mechanism was weakened, whereas the defense mechanism in non-smokers promoted a more favorable healing response."

Research also shows that tobacco smoking releases enzymes that could increase the development of periodontitis, a bacterial infection of the gums, bone and attachment fibers that support the teeth and hold them in the jaw. Once smokers quit, oral health begins to improve.

"Patients who want to quit smoking are urged to increase brushing and flossing their teeth and gums," said Rethman. "It's suggested that the fresh clean feeling a person feels in the mouth after brushing and flossing may curb the urge to smoke. Ironically, these simple tips also help to prevent periodontal diseases."

In conjunction with the Great American Smokeout in November, the AAP has launched a special section on its Web site at www.perio.org to educate people about tobacco's effects on periodontal health.
-end-
A free brochure titled Tobacco and Gum Disease is available by calling 1-800-FLOSS-EM or using the AAP's online request form. The AAP's Web site (www.perio.org) can provide more information and a referral to a nearby periodontist.

The AAP was established in 1914 and focuses on the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases affecting the gums and supporting structures of the teeth and in the placement and maintenance of dental implants.

**EDITOR'S NOTE: A copy of the report published in the Journal of Periodontology's titled "Effect of Tobacco Smoking on Neutrophil Activity Following Periodontal Surgery" is available by calling Amy Duff at 312-573-3244.

American Academy of Periodontology

Related Tobacco Articles from Brightsurf:

UC studies tobacco use, cancer connection
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have identified new clues into ways tobacco use impacts patients with kidney cancer.

'Best' hospitals should be required to deliver tobacco treatment
A UCLA-led report published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine exposes what the authors call a weakness in the high-profile 'Best Hospitals Honor Roll' published annually by US News and World Report.

Small shops, heavy advertisers less likely to ID for tobacco
'Our findings suggest that certain types of stores -- tobacco shops, convenience stores and those with a lot of tobacco advertising -- are more likely to sell tobacco to a young person without checking his or her ID.'

Youth smoking and vaping: What does it mean for tobacco control
New research from PIRE/PRC features analysis of in-depth, qualitative interviews with young vapers in California between 15 and 25.

Truth telling about tobacco and nicotine
In 'Truth Telling about Tobacco and Nicotine,' PRC researchers explain that, although there is agreement among researchers about evidence that vaping can be less harmful than combustible cigarettes, the tobacco control community remains divided about how to communicate -- or even whether to communicate -- information about the relative risks of tobacco and nicotine products.

A 'joint' problem: Investigating marijuana and tobacco co-use
A survey of marijuana and tobacco co-users by Medical University of South Carolina investigators found that co-users with high degree of interrelatedness between their use of the two substances had greater tobacco dependence and smoked more cigarettes per day.

How genes affect tobacco and alcohol use
A new study gives insight into the complexity of genetic and environmental factors that compel some of us to drink and smoke more than others.

Tobacco use linked with higher use of opioids and sedatives
Tobacco is a known risk factor for the misuse of prescription opioids.

Changes in flavored tobacco product use among youth tobacco users
Self-reportedĀ use of flavored tobacco products by middle and high school students decreased from 2014 to 2016 but climbed back up in 2017 in an analysis of national survey data.

Heated tobacco product claims by tobacco industry scrutinized by UCSF researchers
Claims by the tobacco industry that heated tobacco products (HTPs) are safer than conventional cigarettes are not supported by the industry's own data and are likely to be misunderstood by consumers, according to research published in a special issue of Tobacco Control.

Read More: Tobacco News and Tobacco Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.