Rutgers College of Nursing emerita professor Beverly Whipple receives FSSS book award

November 12, 2007

(NEWARK, N.J., Nov. 12, 2007) - The Foundation for the Scientific Study of Sexuality (FSSS) presented its Bonnie and Vern L. Bullough Book Award to Rutgers College of Nursing emerita faculty member Beverly Whipple for her co-authored book The Science of Orgasm during its 50th anniversary meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality in Indianapolis on Nov. 10.

The Bonnie and Vern L. Bullough Award is given by FSSS for the most distinguished book written for the professional sexological community and published during the previous year.

The Science of Orgasm, co-authored by Beverly Whipple, professor emerita, at the College of Nursing at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, with Barry Komisaruk and Carlos Beyer-Flores, offers a thorough compilation of what modern science, from biomechanics to neurochemistry, knows about the secrets of orgasm. It is written for the general public as well as for professionals.

"This is a big honor and very meaningful to me," said Whipple, a Voorhees, N.J. resident. "Vern Bullough is the person who convinced me to do my doctoral degree and Bonnie and Vern nominated me to be a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing. They are the authors of many books in nursing and sexual health."

Whipple's research focused on women's health issues and the sexual physiology of women. She is the co-author of the international bestseller, The G Spot and Other Discoveries about Human Sexuality, which has been translated into 19 languages and was re-published as a classic 23 years later in 2005. Her new book, The Science of Orgasm, published by Johns Hopkins University Press in late October 2006 is now in its second printing. She has co-authored three additional books and written more than 160 research articles and book chapters.

Whipple is a member of a number of honor societies and received the Alumni Achievement award from Wagner College in 1983, as well as the Wagner Alumni Fellows award on June 2, 2007.

In 2006, The New Scientist named her one of the 50 most influential scientists in the world.

She was the president of American Association of Sexuality Educators, Counselors and Therapists (AASECT), president of The Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality (SSSS), vice president of the World Association for Sexology, and was on the Board of the International Society for the Study of Women's Sexual Health. Whipple is now the secretary general of the World Association for Sexual Health and is on the board of the Foundation for the Scientific Study of Sexuality.
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From its headquarters at Rutgers Newark, Rutgers College of Nursing offers a broad range of academic programs on all three Rutgers campuses. The college offers a master's program with unique practitioner specialties, a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree, and the first to offer a Ph.D. nursing degree in New Jersey.

EDITOR'S NOTE: A photo of Beverly Whipple, a Voorhees, N.J. resident, is available at http://nursing.rutgers.edu/files/BeverlyWhipple.jpg

Rutgers University

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