Study shows veterans are becoming more segregated in the US

November 12, 2012

Los Angeles, CA (November 12, 2012) Veterans are becoming more geographically isolated as they migrate to smaller, more rural counties surrounding military bases finds a recent article in Armed Forces & Society, a SAGE journal published on behalf of the Inter-University Seminar on Armed Forces and Society.

Using the 1980, 1990, and 2010 censuses, study author Jay Teachman examined population data from 3131 US counties. He found that the areas to which veterans migrate are becoming more veteran-concentrated which has led to a segregation of Americans between veteran and nonveteran populations.

"The drop in the percentage of veterans is particularly dramatic for the Northeast and the western third of the country," wrote the author. "By 2010 many of the remaining high-density counties were often associated with nearby military installations."

Teachman also found a growing decrease in the proportion of veterans in America in general, stating that between 1980 and 1990, the veteran population fell by an average of 4.6 %, between 1990 and 2000, the average decline was 8.5 %, and between 2000 and 2010, the average decline was 15.54 %.

"The extent to which the veteran population becomes a smaller proportion of the population and is increasingly concentrated means that there will be less contact between the veteran and nonveteran populations," wrote the authors. "The increasing geographic concentration of veterans may hold consequences for civil-military relations."
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Find out more by reading the article, "A Note of Disappearing Veterans: 1980-2010," in Armed Forces & Society (AFS). For an embargoed copy of the full article, please email Camille.Gamboa@sagepub.com

Armed Forces & Society (AFS), a quarterly publication, publishes articles on military institutions, civil-military relations, arms control and peacemaking, and conflict management. The journal is international in scope with a focus on historical, comparative, and interdisciplinary discourse. The editors and contributors include political scientists, sociologists, historians, psychologists, scholars, and economists, as well as specialists in military organization and strategy, arms control, and peacekeeping. http://afs.sagepub.com/
Two-Year Impact Factor: 0.815
Ranked: 67 out of 137 in Sociology and 52 out of 148 in Political Science
Five-Year Impact Factor: 0.918
Ranked: 64 out of 137 in Sociology and 52 out of 148 in Political Science
Source: 2011 Journal Citation Reports® (Thomson Reuters, 2012)

The Inter-University Seminar on Armed Forces and Society (IUS) is a forum for the interchange and assessment of research and scholarship in the social and behavioral sciences dealing with the military establishment and civil-military relations. The Fellows who make up the IUS include academics, military officers, researchers, and students representing a variety of private and public institutions and various academic disciplines. http://www.iusafs.org/

SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets. Since 1965, SAGE has helped inform and educate a global community of scholars, practitioners, researchers, and students spanning a wide range of subject areas including business, humanities, social sciences, and science, technology, and medicine. An independent company, SAGE has principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore and Washington DC. www.sagepublications.com

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