Nav: Home

A new resource for managing crop-damaging greenbugs

November 12, 2015

Greenbugs (Schizaphis graminum) have been a major vexation for growers of wheat and sorghum for more than half a century, especially in the Great Plains. Now a new paper in the open-access Journal of Integrated Pest Management provides an overview of these little aphid and a summary of control methods.

"This was a good opportunity to summarize the literature, and just keep things up to date on this pest," said lead author Tom Royer of Oklahoma State University.

Control of greenbugs remains a challenge, but growers can take steps to keep the insects in check. One method is to plant wheat a little later in the year to avoid early greenbug colonization, but the best approach is to monitor the wheat fields to determine when pesticides make sense, according to Royer. To do that, Dr. Royer advocates the use of Oklahoma State's Glance n' Go system, which he helped to develop over the past decade. The Glance n' Go system typically requires no more than 15 minutes of surveying plants for greenbugs that are either alive or "mummified." Mummified greenbugs signify the presence of their natural enemy, a parasitoid wasp known as Lysiphlebus testaceipes. Growers upload information on their location, time of year, current price of wheat, and control costs into the Glance n' Go system's website, which analyzes the data and calculates a treatment threshold. They can then print a scouting form and take it into the field to determine which areas need to be sprayed.

"That means producers treat only those fields that need it," Royer said.
-end-
The full article, "Greenbug (Hemiptera: Aphididae) Biology, Ecology and Management in Wheat and Sorghum," is available for free at: http://jipm.oxfordjournals.org/lookup/doi/10.1093/jipm/pmv018

The Journal of Integrated Pest Management is published by the Entomological Society of America, the largest organization in the world serving the professional and scientific needs of entomologists and people in related disciplines. Founded in 1889, ESA today has nearly 7,000 members affiliated with educational institutions, health agencies, private industry, and government. Members are researchers, teachers, extension service personnel, administrators, marketing representatives, research technicians, consultants, students, and hobbyists. For more information, visit http://www.entsoc.org.

Entomological Society of America

Related Wheat Articles:

Photosynthesis olympics: can the best wheat varieties be even better?
Scientists have put elite wheat varieties through a sort of 'Photosynthesis Olympics' to find which varieties have the best performing photosynthesis.
Wheat myth debunked
Common opinion has it that modern wheat is so reliant on fertiliser and crop protection agrochemicals that the plants now lack the hardiness needed to remain productive under harsher environmental conditions.
New avenues for improving modern wheat
Since the Agricultural Revolution about 12,000 years ago, humans have been selectively breeding plants with desirable traits such as high grain yield and disease resistance.
What the wheat genome tells us about wars
First they mapped the genome of wheat; now they have reconstructed its breeding history.
CRISPRed wheat helps farmers control weeds
Recently, a research team led by Profs. GAO Caixia and LI Jiayang at the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (IGDB, CAS), together with Associate Prof.
Genome assembly of pasta wheat leads to new insights for modern wheat breeding
Durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. ssp. durum) is the basic commodity for the production of pasta, as this cereal plant yields grains with the necessary high content of gluten proteins.
Old for new, using ancient genetic variation to supercharge wheat
A global, collaborative effort led by the Earlham Institute, UK and CIMMYT, Mexico sheds light on the genetic basis of biomass accumulation and efficiency in use of light, both of which are bottlenecks in yield improvement in wheat.
European wheat lacks climate resilience
A group of European researchers, including Professor Jørgen E. Olesen from the Department of Agroecology at Aarhus University, has found that current breeding programmes and cultivar selection practices do not provide the needed resilience to climate change.
New insights in rust resistance in wheat
Approximately 88 percent of wheat production is susceptible to yellow rust.
Wheat that pumps iron, naturally
Crop breeders are developing a biofortified wheat that could make proper nutrition easier.
More Wheat News and Wheat Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#538 Nobels and Astrophysics
This week we start with this year's physics Nobel Prize awarded to Jim Peebles, Michel Mayor, and Didier Queloz and finish with a discussion of the Nobel Prizes as a way to award and highlight important science. Are they still relevant? When science breakthroughs are built on the backs of hundreds -- and sometimes thousands -- of people's hard work, how do you pick just three to highlight? Join host Rachelle Saunders and astrophysicist, author, and science communicator Ethan Siegel for their chat about astrophysics and Nobel Prizes.